GROWL's Sentences and Contexts

Learn GROWL from sentences of classic books. The app collects 10,000 middle or hard words; input your word, you not only get its meaning and example, but also have sentences and their contexts from classic literatures.

 Sentences of growl
Definition:
v. utter a deep guttural sound, as angry dog; give forth an angry, grumbling sound; emit low guttural sound
Example:
Meanwhile Armstrong continues to grunt, to growl, to bite into his gums but all to no avail: he's over five minutes behind now.
Sentence in Classic:
Besides which, the walls were not thick, and, whenever he passed the evening at our house, we always knew of it by hearing one continual growl in the kitchen.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens Context
I was looking at her with pleasure and admiration, when suddenly the growl swelled into a roar again, and a frightful bumping noise was heard above, as if a giant with a wooden leg were trying to bore it through the ceiling to come at us.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens Context
The dog sat at the bedside: now eyeing his master with a wistful look, and now pricking his ears, and uttering a low growl as some noise in the street, or in the lower part of the house, attracted his attention.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens Context
Prince dropped on his paws and began to growl like a mastiff, while the visitor apologized, saying that he could not possibly come in thus attired, but he begged Lena to lend him some safety pins.
My Antonia By Willa Cather Context
The storm increased, the flashes succeeded one another more rapidly, the thunder began to growl, and the wind, the precursor of a hurricane, whistled in the plumes and the hair of the horsemen.
THE THREE MUSKETEERS By Alexandre Dumas Context
It is more than probable that, in the disordered state of his thoughts, he would soon have fallen into some suspicious, if not fatal, error had not his incipient attempts been interrupted by a fierce growl from the quadruped.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper Context
Old Bruno, a great Newfoundland, who slept at the end of the porch, rose, with a low growl, as she came near.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe Context