HARNESS's Sentences and Contexts

Learn HARNESS from sentences of classic books. The app collects 10,000 middle or hard words; input your word, you not only get its meaning and example, but also have sentences and their contexts from classic literatures.

 Sentences of harness
Definition:
n. stable gear consisting of an arrangement to an animal so that it can be attached to and pull a cart
Example:
The biggest danger beside not wearing your harness is that you can't function properly.
Sentence in Classic:
As a boy he had imagined the reins by which horses are driven as slender silken bands and it shocked him to feel at Stradbrooke the greasy leather of harness.
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man By James Joyce Context
He makes the horses ill with too much water, cuts good harness, barters the tires of the wheels for drink, drops bits of iron into the thrashing machine, so as to break it.
Anna Karenina(V1) By Leo Tolstoy Context
It was so light that he could see the moonlight reflected from the metal harness disks and from the eyes of the horses, who looked round in alarm at the noisy party under the shadow of the porch roof.
War and Peace(V3) By Leo Tolstoy Context
He told Jotham to go out and harness up the greys, and for a moment he and Mattie had the kitchen to themselves.
Ethan Frome By Edith Wharton Context
To the ears of the three on the porch came the sounds of hooves, the jingling of harness chains and the shrill careless laughter of negro voices, as the field hands and mules came in from the fields.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche Context
So Chanticleer began to build a little carriage of nutshells: and when it was finished, Partlet jumped into it and sat down, and bid Chanticleer harness himself to it and draw her home.
Grimms' Fairy Tales By The Brothers Grimm Context
This chain suggested, not the beams, which it was its office to transport, but the mastodons and mammoths which it might have served to harness; it had the air of the galleys, but of cyclopean and superhuman galleys, and it seemed to have been detached from some monster.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo Context
From this secret conflict, always muzzled, but always growling, was born armed peace, that ruinous expedient of civilization which in the harness of the European cabinets is suspicious in itself.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo Context
Aware of their danger, they were going all abreast with great speed straight before the wind, rubbing their flanks as closely as so many spans of horses in harness.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville Context