INEXHAUSTIBLE's Sentences and Contexts

Learn INEXHAUSTIBLE from sentences of classic books. The app collects 10,000 middle or hard words; input your word, you not only get its meaning and example, but also have sentences and their contexts from classic literatures.

 Sentences of inexhaustible
Definition:
a. incapable of being exhausted, emptied, or used up; unfailing; not to be wasted or spent
Example:
Little girl, a memory without blot or contamination must be an exquisite treasure--an inexhaustible source of pure refreshment: is it not?
Sentence in Classic:
Holmes, however, was always in training, for he had inexhaustible stores of nervous energy upon which to draw.
The Return of Sherlock Holmes By Arthur Conan Doyle Context
She sat in the window looking at Dolly, and going over in her own mind all the stores of intimate talk which had seemed so inexhaustible beforehand, and she found nothing.
Anna Karenina(V2) By Leo Tolstoy Context
And these simple words, her look, and the expression on her face which accompanied them, formed for two months the subject of inexhaustible memories, interpretations, and happy meditations for Pierre.
War and Peace(V5) By Leo Tolstoy Context
Much as they were attached to each other, they seemed to draw inexhaustible stores of affection from a very mine of love to bestow them upon me.
Frankenstein By Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley Context
The king, in his inexhaustible clemency, has deigned to commute his penalty to that of penal servitude for life.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo Context
Paris begins with the lounger and ends with the street Arab, two beings of which no other city is capable; the passive acceptance, which contents itself with gazing, and the inexhaustible initiative; Prudhomme and Fouillou.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo Context
There are marvellous relations between beings and things; in that inexhaustible whole, from the sun to the grub, nothing despises the other; all have need of each other.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo Context
I was within and without, simultaneously enchanted and repelled by the inexhaustible variety of life.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald Context