TEMPERATURE's Sentences and Contexts

Learn TEMPERATURE from sentences of classic books. The app collects 10,000 middle or hard words; input your word, you not only get its meaning and example, but also have sentences and their contexts from classic literatures.

 Sentences of temperature
Definition:
n. degree of any quality; condition with respect to heat or cold; degree of heat or cold
Example:
The food should be kept at low temperature.
Sentence in Classic:
But on the seventh day he ate with pleasure a piece of bread with some tea, and the doctor noticed that his temperature was lower.
War and Peace(V4) By Leo Tolstoy Context
I never discovered from whom Joe derived the conventional temperature of the four thousand pounds; but it appeared to make the sum of money more to him, and he had a manifest relish in insisting on its being cool.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens Context
My temper was sometimes violent, and my passions vehement; but by some law in my temperature they were turned not towards childish pursuits but to an eager desire to learn, and not to learn all things indiscriminately.
Frankenstein By Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley Context
Bishop of a mountain diocese, living so very close to nature, in rusticity and deprivation, it appeared that he imported among these eminent personages, ideas which altered the temperature of the assembly.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo Context
By the time they have lounged up and down the promenade of the Equator awhile, they start for the Oriental waters in anticipation of the cool season there, and so evade the other excessive temperature of the year.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville Context
They reached the building, ornamented with magnificent fruits, which ripen at the beginning of July in the artificial temperature which takes the place of the sun, so frequently absent in our climate.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas Context
The whole landscape, which, seen by a favoring light, and in a genial temperature, had been found so lovely, appeared now like some pictured allegory of life, in which objects were arrayed in their harshest but truest colors, and without the relief of any shadowing.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper Context