WEED's Sentences and Contexts

Learn WEED from sentences of classic books. The app collects 10,000 middle or hard words; input your word, you not only get its meaning and example, but also have sentences and their contexts from classic literatures.

 Sentences of weed
Definition:
n. undesirable or troublesome plant, especially growing where it is not wanted as in a garden.
Example:
You know, what you call a weed, to one man it's a flower.
Sentence in Classic:
The wheat crop was full of weeds, and it was discovered that on one of his nocturnal visits Snowball had mixed weed seeds with the seed corn.
Animal Farm By George Orwell Context
What he considered necessary was to cover all the furniture with cretonne, to put up curtains, to weed the garden, to make a little bridge on the pond, and to plant flowers.
Anna Karenina(V1) By Leo Tolstoy Context
If the green and yellow growth of weed in the chinks of the old wall had been the most precious flowers that ever blew, it could not have been more cherished in my remembrance.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens Context
His linen coat and trousers were besmeared with mud; clinging marsh weed was twined round the crown of his old round hat; in his right hand he held a small bag; in the bag something alive was moving.
Fathers and Children By Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev Context
I chucked up my job at Butterley because I thought I was a weed, clerking there: and I got on as overhead blacksmith at Tevershall: shoeing horses mostly.
Lady Chatterley's Lover By D H Lawrence Context
One evening when he was thus standing in the garden, abstractedly spudding up a weed with his stick, a bony figure turned the corner of the house and came up to him.
Return of the Native By Thomas Hardy Context
When he had inhaled enough of the fragrance of the soothing weed, he passed the instrument into the hands of the scout.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper Context
Our agriculture and horticulture destroy a weed just here and there and cultivate perhaps a score or so of wholesome plants, leaving the greater number to fight out a balance as they can.
The Time Machine By H. G. Wells Context