ESCAPE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Escape in David Copperfield
1  I narrowly escaped being run over, twenty times at least, in half a mile.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12. LIKING LIFE ON MY OWN ACCOUNT NO BETTER, I ...
2  Miss Murdstone is the point now, Peggotty, and you sha'n't escape from it.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. MY HOLIDAYS. ESPECIALLY ONE HAPPY AFTERNOON
3  That there was no hope of escape from it, unless the escape was my own act, I knew quite well.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12. LIKING LIFE ON MY OWN ACCOUNT NO BETTER, I ...
4  I rather think that neither the blow, nor the allusion, would have escaped me, but for the assurance I had had from Agnes that night.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42. MISCHIEF
5  I had been writing, in the newspaper and elsewhere, so prosperously, that when my new success was achieved, I considered myself reasonably entitled to escape from the dreary debates.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48. DOMESTIC
6  Why, the fact is,' returned Traddles, 'Mr. Micawber had so completely hemmed him in, and was always ready with so many new points if an old one failed, that he could not escape from us.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 54. Mr. MICAWBER'S TRANSACTIONS
7  After dinner, when we were sitting by the fire, and I was meditating an escape to Peggotty without having the hardihood to slip away, lest it should offend the master of the house, a coach drove up to the garden-gate and he went out to receive the visitor.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
8  Recalled by his request, preferred in quite another tone of voice, I did the honours of the shaving-pot; but I did them with an unsteadiness of hand, a sudden sense of being no match for him, and a perplexed suspicious anxiety as to what he might be going to say next, which I felt could not escape his observation.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 25. GOOD AND BAD ANGELS
9  Ham Peggotty, who went to the national school, and was a very dragon at his catechism, and who may therefore be regarded as a credible witness, reported next day, that happening to peep in at the parlour-door an hour after this, he was instantly descried by Miss Betsey, then walking to and fro in a state of agitation, and pounced upon before he could make his escape.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN