GUMMIDGE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Gummidge in David Copperfield
1  'I feel it more,' said Mrs. Gummidge.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
2  Me, and uncle, and Ham, and Mrs. Gummidge.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
3  'That's Missis Gummidge,' said Mr. Peggotty.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
4  Mrs. Gummidge did not appear to be able to cheer up.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
5  'I feel it more than other people,' said Mrs. Gummidge.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
6  Mrs. Gummidge had never made any other remark than a forlorn sigh, and had never raised her eyes since tea.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
7  Mrs. Gummidge had been in a low state all day, and had burst into tears in the forenoon, when the fire smoked.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
8  We all said something, or looked something, to welcome him, except Mrs. Gummidge, who only shook her head over her knitting.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
9  So at dinner; when Mrs. Gummidge was always helped immediately after me, to whom the preference was given as a visitor of distinction.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
10  Mrs. Gummidge's was rather a fretful disposition, and she whimpered more sometimes than was comfortable for other parties in so small an establishment.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
11  Accordingly, when Mr. Peggotty came home about nine o'clock, this unfortunate Mrs. Gummidge was knitting in her corner, in a very wretched and miserable condition.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
12  I soon found out that Mrs. Gummidge did not always make herself so agreeable as she might have been expected to do, under the circumstances of her residence with Mr. Peggotty.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
13  Mrs. Gummidge's peculiar corner of the fireside seemed to me to be the warmest and snuggest in the place, as her chair was certainly the easiest, but it didn't suit her that day at all.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
14  We all acknowledged that we felt this something of a disappointment; but Mrs. Gummidge said she felt it more than we did, and shed tears again, and made that former declaration with great bitterness.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
15  I was very sorry for her; but there were moments when it would have been more agreeable, I thought, if Mrs. Gummidge had had a convenient apartment of her own to retire to, and had stopped there until her spirits revived.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
16  I discovered this, by his being out on the second or third evening of our visit, and by Mrs. Gummidge's looking up at the Dutch clock, between eight and nine, and saying he was there, and that, what was more, she had known in the morning he would go there.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
17  Then, in the privacy of my own little cabin, she informed me that Ham and Em'ly were an orphan nephew and niece, whom my host had at different times adopted in their childhood, when they were left destitute: and that Mrs. Gummidge was the widow of his partner in a boat, who had died very poor.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
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