GOOD in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
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1  Good yeoman," said Cedric, "my heart is oppressed with sadness.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII.
2  I would not for my cowl that they found us in this goodly exercise.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XX
3  Good yeoman," said the knight, coming forward, "be not wroth with my merry host.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XX
4  Good Dame Urfried," said the other man, "stand not to reason on it, but up and away.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIV
5  Good cheer had opened his heart, for he left me a nook of pasty and a flask of wine, instead of my former fare.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLII
6  But I rather judge it the kinder feelings of nature, which grieves that so goodly a form should be a vessel of perdition.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVIII
7  Good fruit, Sir Knight," said the yeoman, "will sometimes grow on a sorry tree; and evil times are not always productive of evil alone and unmixed.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
8  Good Father Aymer," said the Saxon, "be it known to you, I care not for those over-sea refinements, without which I can well enough take my pleasure in the woods.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
9  Ay, gracious sir," answered the Jew, with more confidence; "and knight and yeoman, squire and vassal, may bless the goodly gift which Heaven hath assigned to her.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXV
10  Good brother," replied the inhabitant of the hermitage, "it has pleased Our Lady and St Dunstan to destine me for the object of those virtues, instead of the exercise thereof.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVI
11  Thou and I are but the blind instruments of some irresistible fatality, that hurries us along, like goodly vessels driving before the storm, which are dashed against each other, and so perish.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIX
12  Isaac, recalled to think of his worldly goods, the love of which, by dint of inveterate habit, contended even with his parental affection, grew pale, stammered, and could not deny there might be some small surplus.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
13  I know," he said, "that ye errant knights desire to carry your fortunes on the point of your lance, and reck not of land or goods; but war is a changeful mistress, and a home is sometimes desirable even to the champion whose trade is wandering.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII.
14  Holy Clerk," said the stranger, after the first cup was thus swallowed, "I cannot but marvel that a man possessed of such thews and sinews as thine, and who therewithal shows the talent of so goodly a trencher-man, should think of abiding by himself in this wilderness.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVI
15  Athelstane had this quality at least; and though he had few mental accomplishments or talents to recommend him as a leader, he had still a goodly person, was no coward, had been accustomed to martial exercises, and seemed willing to defer to the advice of counsellors more wise than himself.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
16  It was a goodly, and at the same time an anxious, sight, to behold so many gallant champions, mounted bravely, and armed richly, stand ready prepared for an encounter so formidable, seated on their war-saddles like so many pillars of iron, and awaiting the signal of encounter with the same ardour as their generous steeds, which, by neighing and pawing the ground, gave signal of their impatience.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII