HEART in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - Heart in Wuthering Heights
1  A sudden sense of relief flowed from my heart through every limb.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
2  I did not want him to yield, though I could not help being afraid in my heart.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
3  I gave him my heart, and he took and pinched it to death, and flung it back to me.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
4  She must have had a warm heart, when she loved her father so, to give so much to me.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIII
5  He signed her to precede him; and casting back a look that cut my heart, she obeyed.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
6  He did not forget me; for he had a kind heart, though he was rather severe sometimes.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
7  I dreamt I was sleeping the last sleep by that sleeper, with my heart stopped and my cheek frozen against hers.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
8  Her spirit was high, though not rough, and qualified by a heart sensitive and lively to excess in its affections.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
9  She is better acquainted with his heart than I, or any one besides; and she never would represent him as worse than he is.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
10  I should be in a curious taking if I surrendered my heart to that young person, and the daughter turned out a second edition of the mother.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIV
11  And Catherine has a heart as deep as I have: the sea could be as readily contained in that horse-trough as her whole affection be monopolised by him.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIV
12  I had not the heart to leave my charge; and besides, you know, I had been his foster-sister, and excused his behaviour more readily than a stranger would.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
13  He was not insolent to his benefactor, he was simply insensible; though knowing perfectly the hold he had on his heart, and conscious he had only to speak and all the house would be obliged to bend to his wishes.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
14  When I first looked into his face, I perceived that he had got intelligence of the catastrophe; and a foolish notion struck me that his heart was quelled and he prayed, because his lips moved and his gaze was bent on the ground.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVI
15  I thought as I lay there, with my head against that table leg, and my eyes dimly discerning the grey square of the window, that I was enclosed in the oak-panelled bed at home; and my heart ached with some great grief which, just waking, I could not recollect.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
16  In summer Miss Catherine delighted to climb along these trunks, and sit in the branches, swinging twenty feet above the ground; and I, pleased with her agility and her light, childish heart, still considered it proper to scold every time I caught her at such an elevation, but so that she knew there was no necessity for descending.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII
17  I bid them be quiet, now that they saw me returned, and, benumbed to my very heart, I dragged up-stairs; whence, after putting on dry clothes, and pacing to and fro thirty or forty minutes, to restore the animal heat, I adjourned to my study, feeble as a kitten: almost too much so to enjoy the cheerful fire and smoking coffee which the servant had prepared for my refreshment.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.