LADY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Lady in David Copperfield
1  'That won't do,' returned the lady.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
2  That's why I should like so much to be a lady.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
3  I had never, at that time, seen such a metallic lady altogether as Miss Murdstone was.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
4  But that lady, kissing me, and making me put them back in my pocket, replied that she couldn't think of it.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11. I BEGIN LIFE ON MY OWN ACCOUNT, AND DON'T ...
5  There was a very dirty lady in his little room, and two wan girls, his daughters, with shock heads of hair.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11. I BEGIN LIFE ON MY OWN ACCOUNT, AND DON'T ...
6  A ladder was brought, and I got down after the lady, who was like a haystack: not daring to stir, until her basket was removed.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
7  Mental suffering and trial supply, in some natures, the place of years, and I will be as plain with you as if I were a Lady Abbess.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37. A LITTLE COLD WATER
8  She was very earnestly and humbly entreating Miss Murdstone's pardon, which that lady granted, and a perfect reconciliation took place.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
9  Opposite me was an elderly lady in a great fur cloak, who looked in the dark more like a haystack than a lady, she was wrapped up to such a degree.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
10  This lady had a basket with her, and she hadn't known what to do with it, for a long time, until she found that on account of my legs being short, it could go underneath me.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
11  The setting sun was glowing on the strange lady, over the garden-fence, and she came walking up to the door with a fell rigidity of figure and composure of countenance that could have belonged to nobody else.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
12  There was a table, and a Dutch clock, and a chest of drawers, and on the chest of drawers there was a tea-tray with a painting on it of a lady with a parasol, taking a walk with a military-looking child who was trundling a hoop.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
13  The doctor having been upstairs and come down again, and having satisfied himself, I suppose, that there was a probability of this unknown lady and himself having to sit there, face to face, for some hours, laid himself out to be polite and social.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
14  Those allied powers were considerably astonished, when they arrived within a few minutes of each other, to find an unknown lady of portentous appearance, sitting before the fire, with her bonnet tied over her left arm, stopping her ears with jewellers' cotton.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
15  That there were now occasional sounds of feet and voices overhead which he inferred the cotton did not exclude, from the circumstance of his evidently being clutched by the lady as a victim on whom to expend her superabundant agitation when the sounds were loudest.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
16  In a short pause which ensued, she had a fancy that she felt Miss Betsey touch her hair, and that with no ungentle hand; but, looking at her, in her timid hope, she found that lady sitting with the skirt of her dress tucked up, her hands folded on one knee, and her feet upon the fender, frowning at the fire.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
17  It was Miss Murdstone who was arrived, and a gloomy-looking lady she was; dark, like her brother, whom she greatly resembled in face and voice; and with very heavy eyebrows, nearly meeting over her large nose, as if, being disabled by the wrongs of her sex from wearing whiskers, she had carried them to that account.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
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