LADY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Lady in Oliver Twist
1  The old lady dropped a curtsey.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
2  'Hush, my dear,' said the old lady softly.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
3  'He need be, for he eats enough,' observed the lady.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
4  'That was the fever, my dear,' said the old lady mildly.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
5  'Come in,' said the old lady; and in walked Mr. Brownlow.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
6  A deal, said the old lady, laughing very heartily at her own acuteness.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
7  Never mind me, my dear,' said the old lady; 'I'm only having a regular good cry.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
8  'Why, really, my dear, I don't know,' answered the old lady in a good-humoured manner.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
9  Mr. Sowerberry remarked it and, without allowing time for any observation on the good lady's part, proceeded.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
10  The old lady made a respectful inclination of the head, which seemed to say that she thought the doctor was a very clever man.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
11  He turned from this young lady, who was gaily, not to say gorgeously attired, in a red gown, green boots, and yellow curl-papers, to the other female.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
12  Having him set, here, by the fire-side, the good old lady sat herself down too; and, being in a state of considerable delight at seeing him so much better, forthwith began to cry most violently.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
13  So, Oliver kept very still; partly because he was anxious to obey the kind old lady in all things; and partly, to tell the truth, because he was completely exhausted with what he had already said.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
14  The old lady tenderly bade him good-night shortly afterwards, and left him in charge of a fat old woman who had just come: bringing with her, in a little bundle, a small Prayer Book and a large nightcap.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
15  The curtain at the bed's head was hastily drawn back, and a motherly old lady, very neatly and precisely dressed, rose as she undrew it, from an arm-chair close by, in which she had been sitting at needle-work.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
16  And with this, the old lady applied herself to warming up, in a little saucepan, a basin full of broth: strong enough, Oliver thought, to furnish an ample dinner, when reduced to the regulation strength, for three hundred and fifty paupers, at the lowest computation.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
17  In fact, if it had not been for a good-hearted turnpike-man, and a benevolent old lady, Oliver's troubles would have been shortened by the very same process which had put an end to his mother's; in other words, he would most assuredly have fallen dead upon the king's highway.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
18  Every member of the respectable coterie appeared plunged in his own reflections; not excepting the dog, who by a certain malicious licking of his lips seemed to be meditating an attack upon the legs of the first gentleman or lady he might encounter in the streets when he went out.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
19  The old lady made no reply to this; but wiping her eyes first, and her spectacles, which lay on the counterpane, afterwards, as if they were part and parcel of those features, brought some cool stuff for Oliver to drink; and then, patting him on the cheek, told him he must lie very quiet, or he would be ill again.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
20  Oliver did see it in his mind's eye as distinctly as if he had not altered his position; but he thought it better not to worry the kind old lady; so he smiled gently when she looked at him; and Mrs. Bedwin, satisfied that he felt more comfortable, salted and broke bits of toasted bread into the broth, with all the bustle befitting so solemn a preparation.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII