SIKES in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - Sikes in Oliver Twist
1  'She'll go, Fagin,' said Sikes.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
2  'Yes, she will, Fagin,' said Sikes.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
3  'That's very likely,' returned Sikes with a malicious grin.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
4  'And mind you don't poison it,' said Mr. Sikes, laying his hat upon the table.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
5  'She's a honour to her sex,' said Mr. Sikes, filling his glass, and smiting the table with his enormous fist.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
6  Mr. Sikes, being disappointed of the dog's participation, at once transferred his share in the quarrel to the new comer.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
7  This resistance only infuriated Mr. Sikes the more; who, dropping on his knees, began to assail the animal most furiously.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
8  'Somebody must find out wot's been done at the office,' said Mr. Sikes in a much lower tone than he had taken since he came in.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
9  If he hasn't peached, and is committed, there's no fear till he comes out again,' said Mr. Sikes, 'and then he must be taken care on.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
10  Having given in a hearty shake, he retired, growling, under a form; just escaping the pewter measure which Mr. Sikes levelled at his head.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
11  Mr. Sikes contented himself with tying an imaginary knot under his left ear, and jerking his head over on the right shoulder; a piece of dumb show which the Jew appeared to understand perfectly.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
12  This was, that the Dodger, and Charley Bates, and Fagin, and Mr. William Sikes, happened, one and all, to entertain a violent and deeply-rooted antipathy to going near a police-office on any ground or pretext whatever.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
13  Mr. Bill Sikes no sooner heard the account of the expedition delivered, than he very hastily called up the white dog, and, putting on his hat, expeditiously departed: without devoting any time to the formality of wishing the company good-morning.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
14  Dogs are not generally apt to revenge injuries inflicted upon them by their masters; but Mr. Sikes's dog, having faults of temper in common with his owner, and labouring, perhaps, at this moment, under a powerful sense of injury, made no more ado but at once fixed his teeth in one of the half-boots.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
15  The dog jumped from right to left, and from left to right; snapping, growling, and barking; the man thrust and swore, and struck and blasphemed; and the struggle was reaching a most critical point for one or other; when, the door suddenly opening, the dog darted out: leaving Bill Sikes with the poker and the clasp-knife in his hands.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
16  The dog no doubt heard; because Mr. Sikes spoke in the very harshest key of a very harsh voice; but, appearing to entertain some unaccountable objection to having his throat cut, he remained where he was, and growled more fiercely than before: at the same time grasping the end of the poker between his teeth, and biting at it like a wild beast.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
17  After swallowing two of three glasses of spirits, Mr. Sikes condescended to take some notice of the young gentlemen; which gracious act led to a conversation, in which the cause and manner of Oliver's capture were circumstantially detailed, with such alterations and improvements on the truth, as to the Dodger appeared most advisable under the circumstances.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
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