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Quotes from Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
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 Current Search - Legree in Uncle Tom's Cabin
1  But Simon Legree heard no voice.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER XXXI
2  "Take off your boots," said Mr. Legree.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER XXXI
3  Legree took a silent note of Tom's availability.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER XXXIII
4  Her master is Mr. Legree, who owns a cotton plantation on the Red River.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER XXX
5  At last the boat stopped at a small town, and Legree, with his party, disembarked.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER XXXI
6  Legree, like some potentates we read of in history, governed his plantation by a sort of resolution of forces.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER XXXII
7  As they stood there now by Legree, they seemed an apt illustration of the fact that brutal men are lower even than animals.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER XXXII
8  It was well he did so; for Mr. Legree, having refitted Tom's handcuffs, proceeded deliberately to investigate the contents of his pockets.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER XXXI
9  Having died insolvent, it had been purchased, at a bargain, by Legree, who used it, as he did everything else, merely as an implement for money-making.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER XXXII
10  Legree had been drinking to that degree that he was inclining to be very gracious; and it was about this time that the enclosures of the plantation rose to view.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER XXXII
11  When Legree scolded and stormed, Emmeline was terrified; but when he laid his hand on her, and spoke as he now did, she felt as if she had rather he would strike her.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER XXXII
12  Tom in various ways manifested a tenderness of feeling, a commiseration for his fellow-sufferers, strange and new to them, which was watched with a jealous eye by Legree.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER XXXIII
13  A dark, wild face was seen, for a moment, to glance at the window of the house; and, as Legree opened the door, a female voice said something, in a quick, imperative tone.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER XXXII
14  "If there were no planters except such as that one," said he, pointing with his finger to Legree, who stood with his back to them, "the whole thing would go down like a millstone."
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER XXXI
15  Legree had trained them in savageness and brutality as systematically as he had his bull-dogs; and, by long practice in hardness and cruelty, brought their whole nature to about the same range of capacities.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER XXXII
16  In the wagon was seated Simon Legree and the two women, still fettered together, were stowed away with some baggage in the back part of it, and the whole company were seeking Legree's plantation, which lay a good distance off.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER XXXII
17  Mr. Simon Legree, Tom's master, had purchased slaves at one place and another, in New Orleans, to the number of eight, and driven them, handcuffed, in couples of two and two, down to the good steamer Pirate, which lay at the levee, ready for a trip up the Red River.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER XXXI
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