MUSLIN in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Muslin in Northanger Abbey
1  Muslin can never be said to be wasted.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
2  You know I wanted you, when we first came, not to buy that sprigged muslin, but you would.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
3  "That is exactly what I should have guessed it, madam," said Mr. Tilney, looking at the muslin.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
4  Miss Tilney was in a very pretty spotted muslin, and I fancy, by what I can learn, that she always dresses very handsomely.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
5  Mr. Tilney was polite enough to seem interested in what she said; and she kept him on the subject of muslins till the dancing recommenced.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
6  But then you know, madam, muslin always turns to some account or other; Miss Morland will get enough out of it for a handkerchief, or a cap, or a cloak.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
7  Catherine knew all this very well; her great aunt had read her a lecture on the subject only the Christmas before; and yet she lay awake ten minutes on Wednesday night debating between her spotted and her tamboured muslin, and nothing but the shortness of the time prevented her buying a new one for the evening.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
8  It would be mortifying to the feelings of many ladies, could they be made to understand how little the heart of man is affected by what is costly or new in their attire; how little it is biased by the texture of their muslin, and how unsusceptible of peculiar tenderness towards the spotted, the sprigged, the mull, or the jackonet.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10