ROME in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius by Niccolo Machiavelli
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 Current Search - Rome in Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius
1  of the Beginnings of Cities in general, and in particular of that of Rome.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I.
2  I have spoken above of the effects produced in Rome by the controversies between the commons and the senate.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI.
3  Wherefore, it seems to me worth while to consider whether the government of Rome could ever have been constituted in such a way as to prevent like controversies.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI.
4  For from the time of the Tarquins to that of the Gracchi, a period of over three hundred years, the tumults in Rome seldom gave occasion to punishment by exile, and very seldom to bloodshed.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV.
5  We should, therefore, be careful how we censure the government of Rome, and should reflect that all the great results effected by that republic, could not have come about without good cause.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV.
6  So that Fortune, if she bestowed not her first favours on Rome, bestowed her second; because, although the original institutions of this city were defective, still they lay not outside the true path which could bring them to perfection.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II.
7  Now, as these lasted down to the time of the Gracchi, when they brought about the overthrow of freedom, some may think it matter for regret that Rome should not have achieved the great things she did, without being torn by such disputes.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI.
8  Nor was this enough for them, but, carried away by the same factious spirit, they began after a time to pay court to such men as they thought able to attack the nobility, and so gave occasion to the rise of Marius and the overthrow of Rome.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V.
9  No one who reads how the city of Rome had its beginning, who were its founders, and what its ordinances and laws, will marvel that so much excellence was maintained in it through many ages, or that it grew afterwards to be so great an Empire.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I.
10  If we look to reasons, something is to be said on both sides of the question; though were we to look to results, we should have to pronounce in favour of the nobles, inasmuch as the liberty of Sparta and Venice has had a longer life than that of Rome.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V.
11  In making this inquiry we must first look to those republics which have enjoyed freedom for a great while, undisturbed by any violent contentions or tumults, and see what their government was, and whether it would have been possible to introduce it into Rome.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI.
12  I cannot indeed deny that the good fortune and the armies of Rome were the causes of her empire; yet it certainly seems to me that those holding this opinion fail to perceive, that in a State where there are good soldiers there must be good order, and, generally speaking, good fortune.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV.
13  For to some at their very first commencement, or not long after, laws have been given by a single legislator, and all at one time; like those given by Lycurgus to the Spartans; while to others they have been given at different times, as need rose or accident determined; as in the case of Rome.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II.
14  In Rome, after the expulsion of the Tarquins, it seemed as though the closest union prevailed between the senate and the commons, and that the nobles, laying aside their natural arrogance, had learned so to sympathize with the people as to have become supportable by all, even of the humblest rank.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III.
15  But let us now turn to Rome, which city, although she had no Lycurgus to give her from the first such a constitution as would preserve her long in freedom, through a series of accidents, caused by the contests between the commons and the senate, obtained by chance what the foresight of her founders failed to provide.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II.
16  And had the Roman commonwealth grown to be more tranquil, this inconvenience would have resulted, that it must at the same time have grown weaker, since the road would have been closed to that greatness to which it came, for in removing the causes of her tumults, Rome must have interfered with the causes of her growth.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI.
17  Weighing all which circumstances, we see that to have kept Rome in the same tranquility wherein these republics were kept, one of two courses must have been followed by her legislators; for either, like the Venetians, they must have refrained from employing the commons in war, or else, like the Spartans, they must have closed their country to foreigners.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI.
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