SLAVES in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Gone With The Wind by Margaret Mitche
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 Current Search - Slaves in Gone With The Wind
1  Slaves were neither miserable nor unfortunate.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLII
2  Why, all we have is cotton and slaves and arrogance.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
3  They had money enough and slaves enough to give them time to play, and they liked to play.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
4  He cleared the fields and planted cotton and borrowed more money from James and Andrew to buy more slaves.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
5  With a ruthless singleness of purpose, he desired his own house, his own plantation, his own horse, his own slaves.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
6  But the planters' ladies and the planters' slaves could not overlook the fact that he was not born a gentleman, even if their men folks could.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
7  Their family had more money, more horses, more slaves than any one else in the County, but the boys had less grammar than most of their poor Cracker neighbors.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
8  There was hardly a family in Georgia who could not own to their sorrow at least one male member or relative who gambled, losing money, houses, land and slaves.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
9  It was delicate embroidery if company were present, but at other times her hands were occupied with Gerald's ruffled shirts, the girls' dresses or garments for the slaves.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
10  His own social status was assured because the Tarletons owned a hundred negroes and, like all slaves of large planters, he looked down on small farmers whose slaves were few.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
11  Tom Slattery owned no slaves, and he and his two oldest boys spasmodically worked their few acres of cotton, while the wife and younger children tended what was supposed to be a vegetable garden.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
12  She had on her bonnet, shawl and mittens, and behind her was Mammy, her face like a thundercloud, holding in her hand the black leather bag in which Ellen O'Hara always carried the bandages and medicines she used in doctoring the slaves.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
13  It was merely a quaint custom of the County that daughters only married into families who had lived in the South much longer than twenty-two years, had owned land and slaves and been addicted only to the fashionable vices during that time.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
14  Here and there some lone woman remained with a few frightened slaves, and they came to the road to cheer the soldiers, to bring buckets of well water for the thirsty men, to bind up the wounds and bury the dead in their own family burying grounds.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
15  The air was always thick with threats of selling slaves south and of direful whippings, but there never had been a slave sold from Tara and only one whipping, and that administered for not grooming down Gerald's pet horse after a long day's hunting.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
16  He admired the drawling elegance of the wealthy rice and cotton planters, who rode into Savannah from their moss-hung kingdoms, mounted on thoroughbred horses and followed by the carriages of their equally elegant ladies and the wagons of their slaves.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
17  The editor, sensing the social drama of the letter, put it on the second page of the paper, in itself a startling innovation, as the first two pages of the paper were always devoted to advertisements of slaves, mules, plows, coffins, houses for sale or rent, cures for private diseases, abortifacients and restoratives for lost manhood.
Gone With The Wind By Margaret Mitche
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
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