WEATHER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
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 Current Search - Weather in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
1  We was down south in the warm weather now, and a mighty long ways from home.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI.
2  The young chap was mighty thankful; said it was tough work toting his baggage such weather.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIV.
3  I begun to lay for a chance; I reckoned I would sneak out and go for the woods till the weather moderated.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII.
4  Living in a house and sleeping in a bed pulled on me pretty tight mostly, but before the cold weather I used to slide out and sleep in the woods sometimes, and so that was a rest to me.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV.
5  Pretty soon we come to a nice innocent-looking young country jake setting on a log swabbing the sweat off of his face, for it was powerful warm weather; and he had a couple of big carpet-bags by him.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIV.
6  Right in the middle of the wigwam we made a layer of dirt about five or six inches deep with a frame around it for to hold it to its place; this was to build a fire on in sloppy weather or chilly; the wigwam would keep it from being seen.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII.
7  Of course there was a booming current; and of course that boat started her engines again ten seconds after she stopped them, for they never cared much for raftsmen; so now she was churning along up the river, out of sight in the thick weather, though I could hear her.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVI.
8  When it was beginning to come on dark we poked our heads out of the cottonwood thicket, and looked up and down and across; nothing in sight; so Jim took up some of the top planks of the raft and built a snug wigwam to get under in blazing weather and rainy, and to keep the things dry.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII.
9  When we was three-quarters of a mile below we hoisted up our signal lantern; and about ten o'clock it come on to rain and blow and thunder and lighten like everything; so the king told us to both stay on watch till the weather got better; then him and the duke crawled into the wigwam and turned in for the night.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XX.