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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - able in David Copperfield
1  Perhaps you won't be able to help it.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42. MISCHIEF
2  Mrs. Gummidge did not appear to be able to cheer up.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
3  No, I have not been able to dispose of Mr. Jack Maldon yet.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. I AM A NEW BOY IN MORE SENSES THAN ONE
4  She seemed to be able to speak or think about nothing else.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20. STEERFORTH'S HOME
5  I assented to this proposal, in default of being able to suggest anything else.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19. I LOOK ABOUT ME, AND MAKE A DISCOVERY
6  To save her from misconstruction, cruel misconstruction, that even my friends have not been able to avoid, becomes my duty.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42. MISCHIEF
7  Your clothes will be looked after for you, too,' said Mr. Murdstone; 'as you will not be able, yet awhile, to get them for yourself.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. I BECOME NEGLECTED, AND AM PROVIDED FOR
8  I submitted; and, with a countenance as expressive as I was able to make it of dejected and despairing constancy, came out of the room.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 38. A DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP
9  He is better able to judge of it than I am; for I very well know that I am a weak, light, girlish creature, and that he is a firm, grave, serious man.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. MY HOLIDAYS. ESPECIALLY ONE HAPPY AFTERNOON
10  I brushed away the tears that my utmost resolution had not been able to keep back, and I made a clumsy laugh of it, and we sat down together, side by side.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19. I LOOK ABOUT ME, AND MAKE A DISCOVERY
11  You may suppose I am not able to walk as fast as you, with my short legs and short breath, and I couldn't overtake you; but I guessed where you came, and came after you.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32. THE BEGINNING OF A LONG JOURNEY
12  I really had not yet been able to make up my mind whether I liked Uriah or detested him; and I was very doubtful about it still, as I stood looking him in the face in the street.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17. SOMEBODY TURNS UP
13  My bed at night was under another haystack, where I rested comfortably, after having washed my blistered feet in a stream, and dressed them as well as I was able, with some cool leaves.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13. THE SEQUEL OF MY RESOLUTION
14  I sat looking at Peggotty for some time, in a reverie on this supposititious case: whether, if she were employed to lose me like the boy in the fairy tale, I should be able to track my way home again by the buttons she would shed.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
15  Being very anxious to leave no stone unturned, I waited until Mr. Spenlow came in, and then described what had passed; giving him to understand that I was not hopeless of his being able to soften the adamantine jorkins, if he would undertake the task.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35. DEPRESSION
16  So we got on, until she was able to smile, and then to laugh, and then to sit up, half ashamed; while Peggotty recalled her stray ringlets, dried her eyes, and made her neat again, lest her uncle should wonder, when she got home, why his darling had been crying.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22. SOME OLD SCENES, AND SOME NEW PEOPLE
17  All these wonders afforded Peggotty as much pleasure as she was able to enjoy, under existing circumstances: except, I think, St. Paul's, which, from her long attachment to her work-box, became a rival of the picture on the lid, and was, in some particulars, vanquished, she considered, by that work of art.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33. BLISSFUL
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