AGE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from King Lear by William Shakespeare
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 Current Search - age in King Lear
1  Tis the infirmity of his age: yet he hath ever but slenderly known himself.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
2  I begin to find an idle and fond bondage in the oppression of aged tyranny; who sways not as it hath power, but as it is suffered.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
3  But I have heard him oft maintain it to be fit that, sons at perfect age, and fathers declined, the father should be as ward to the son, and the son manage his revenue.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
4  Know that we have divided In three our kingdom: and 'tis our fast intent To shake all cares and business from our age; Conferring them on younger strengths, while we Unburden'd crawl toward death.'
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
5  You see how full of changes his age is; the observation we have made of it hath not been little: he always loved our sister most; and with what poor judgement he hath now cast her off appears too grossly.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
6  Be, then, desir'd By her that else will take the thing she begs A little to disquantity your train; And the remainder that shall still depend, To be such men as may besort your age, Which know themselves, and you.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
7  This is most strange, That she, who even but now was your best object, The argument of your praise, balm of your age, The best, the dearest, should in this trice of time Commit a thing so monstrous, to dismantle So many folds of favour.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
8  The best and soundest of his time hath been but rash; then must we look from his age to receive not alone the imperfections of long-engrafted condition, but therewithal the unruly waywardness that infirm and choleric years bring with them.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
9  Sir, I thought it fit To send the old and miserable King To some retention and appointed guard; Whose age has charms in it, whose title more, To pluck the common bosom on his side, And turn our impress'd lances in our eyes Which do command them.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT V