BEAT in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - beat in Oliver Twist
1  They renewed their charitable efforts, and he beat them off.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER LII
2  They beat and ill-use me, Dick; and I am going to seek my fortune, some long way off.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
3  His heart beat quickly when he bethought himself of this; and he half resolved to turn back.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
4  A sharp rain, too, was beating against the window-panes; and the sky looked black and cloudy.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XX
5  'Yes,' said Monks, scowling at the trembling boy: the beating of whose heart he might have heard.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER LI
6  When the coach turned into it, his heart beat so violently, that he could scarcely draw his breath.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
7  But, Oliver felt it not, as it beat against him; for he still lay stretched, helpless and unconscious, on his bed of clay.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII
8  'Not I,' said Monks, turning away his eyes and beating his foot upon the ground, as a man who is determined to deny everything.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLIX
9  Oliver's clothes had been torn in the beating he had received; his face was bruised and scratched; and his hair scattered over his forehead.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
10  The girl beat her hands upon her knees, and her feet upon the ground; and, suddenly stopping, drew her shawl close round her: and shivered with cold.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XX
11  With these words, which were uttered with all the energy of passionate grief, Oliver fell upon his knees at the Jew's feet; and beat his hands together, in perfect desperation.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVI
12  When they were all wearied out, and could tear and beat no longer, they dragged Oliver, struggling and shouting, but nothing daunted, into the dust-cellar, and there locked him up.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
13  Monks brought up the rear, after pausing on the steps to satisfy himself that there were no other sounds to be heard than the beating of the rain without, and the rushing of the water.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVIII
14  The certainty of immediate detection if he fired, flashed across his mind even in the midst of his fury; and he beat it twice with all the force he could summon, upon the upturned face that almost touched his own.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVII
15  At times, he turned, with desperate determination, resolved to beat this phantom off, though it should look him dead; but the hair rose on his head, and his blood stood still, for it had turned with him and was behind him then.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVIII
16  He continued to utter the most fearful imprecations, until the driver had resumed his seat; and when they were once more on their way, they could see him some distance behind: beating his feet upon the ground, and tearing his hair, in transports of real or pretended rage.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
17  After a great deal of haggling and squabbling, Fagin beat down the amount of the required advance from five pounds to three pounds four and sixpence: protesting with many solemn asseverations that that would only leave him eighteen-pence to keep house with; Mr. Sikes sullenly remarking that if he couldn't get any more he must accompany him home; with the Dodger and Master Bates put the eatables in the cupboard.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIX
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.