BORROW in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - borrow in David Copperfield
1  I thought it was better to borrow Captain Hopkins's knife and fork, than Captain Hopkins's comb.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11. I BEGIN LIFE ON MY OWN ACCOUNT, AND DON'T ...
2  Six tea, two salt, and a pair of sugars, I have at different times borrowed money on, in secret, with my own hands.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11. I BEGIN LIFE ON MY OWN ACCOUNT, AND DON'T ...
3  For this express reason, I had borrowed the half-guinea, that I might not be without a fund for my travelling-expenses.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12. LIKING LIFE ON MY OWN ACCOUNT NO BETTER, I ...
4  I was not so savagely independent as to say anything in reply, but that if ever I borrowed money of anyone, I would borrow it of her.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37. A LITTLE COLD WATER
5  I was not so savagely independent as to say anything in reply, but that if ever I borrowed money of anyone, I would borrow it of her.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37. A LITTLE COLD WATER
6  After which he borrowed a shilling of me for porter, gave me a written order on Mrs. Micawber for the amount, and put away his pocket-handkerchief, and cheered up.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11. I BEGIN LIFE ON MY OWN ACCOUNT, AND DON'T ...
7  This nerved me to get rid of Mary Anne, who went so mildly, on receipt of wages, that I was surprised, until I found out about the tea-spoons, and also about the little sums she had borrowed in my name of the tradespeople without authority.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 44. OUR HOUSEKEEPING
8  I never could have derived anything like the pleasure from spending the money Mr. Dick had given me, that I felt in sending a gold half-guinea to Peggotty, per post, enclosed in this last letter, to discharge the sum I had borrowed of her: in which epistle, not before, I mentioned about the young man with the donkey-cart.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17. SOMEBODY TURNS UP