CHILDREN in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - children in Northanger Abbey
1  Her father had no ward, and the squire of the parish no children.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
2  Catherine herself could not be more ignorant at the time of all this, than his own children.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
3  Perhaps it may seem odd, that with only two younger children, I should think any profession necessary for him; and certainly there are moments when we could all wish him disengaged from every tie of business.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
4  A family of ten children will be always called a fine family, where there are heads and arms and legs enough for the number; but the Morlands had little other right to the word, for they were in general very plain, and Catherine, for many years of her life, as plain as any.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
5  A living, of which Mr. Morland was himself patron and incumbent, of about four hundred pounds yearly value, was to be resigned to his son as soon as he should be old enough to take it; no trifling deduction from the family income, no niggardly assignment to one of ten children.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
6  Soon after this, the general found himself obliged to go to London for a week; and he left Northanger earnestly regretting that any necessity should rob him even for an hour of Miss Morland's company, and anxiously recommending the study of her comfort and amusement to his children as their chief object in his absence.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
7  Far from comprehending him or his sister in their father's misconduct, Mrs. Morland had been always kindly disposed towards each, and instantly, pleased by his appearance, received him with the simple professions of unaffected benevolence; thanking him for such an attention to her daughter, assuring him that the friends of her children were always welcome there, and entreating him to say not another word of the past.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30