CONSCIENCE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - conscience in David Copperfield
1  I had the conscience of an assassin, and was haunted by a vague sense of enormous wickedness.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 44. OUR HOUSEKEEPING
2  I began to reflect whether I had done anything to offend her; and my conscience whispered me that I had not yet told her about Dora.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34. MY AUNT ASTONISHES ME
3  I have not seen my mother this long time, and it lies upon my conscience, for it's something to be loved as she loves her prodigal son.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28. Mr. MICAWBER'S GAUNTLET
4  If the individuals in the Money Market oblige Mr. Micawber to sustain a great sacrifice, that is between themselves and their consciences.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28. Mr. MICAWBER'S GAUNTLET
5  But I was no sooner turned towards it, than my reproachful young conscience seemed to point that way with a ready finger; and I felt, all the more for the sinking of my spirits, that it was my nest, and that my mother was my comforter and friend.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
6  We supposed he had now eased his mind, and told the worst he knew of the cook; but, a day or two afterwards, his conscience sustained a new twinge, and he disclosed how she had a little girl, who, early every morning, took away our bread; and also how he himself had been suborned to maintain the milkman in coals.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48. DOMESTIC
7  My visitors seemed to breathe more freely when he was gone; but my own relief was very great, for besides the constraint, arising from that extraordinary sense of being at a disadvantage which I always had in this man's presence, my conscience had embarrassed me with whispers that I had mistrusted his master, and I could not repress a vague uneasy dread that he might find it out.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28. Mr. MICAWBER'S GAUNTLET