DISTRUST in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper
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 Current Search - distrust in The Last of the Mohicans
1  The chiefs in front scarce cast a glance at his person, keeping their eyes on the ground, with an air that might have been intended for respect, but which it was quite easy to construe into distrust.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
2  No honest man will deny it," said the scout, a little nettled at the implied distrust of his explanation of the mystery of the tides; "and I grant that it is true on the small scale, and where the land is level.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
3  The Delawares held their breath in expectation; but Magua himself, even while he distrusted the forbearance of his enemy, remained immovable and calm, where he stood wedged in by the crowd, as one who grew to the spot.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
4  The eye of the hunter, or scout, whichever he might be, was small, quick, keen, and restless, roving while he spoke, on every side of him, as if in quest of game, or distrusting the sudden approach of some lurking enemy.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
5  His gaze at the ramparts was not that of a curious or idle spectator; but his looks wandered from point to point, denoting his knowledge of military usages, and betraying that his search was not unaccompanied by distrust.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17
6  Chafed by the silent imputation, and inwardly troubled by so unaccountable a circumstance, the chief advanced to the side of the bed, and, stooping, cast an incredulous look at the features, as if distrusting their reality.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
7  Magua affected to consider the expedient, which he well knew proceeded from distrust of himself, as a compliment, and made a gesture of acquiescence, well content that his veracity should be supported by so skillful a marksman as the scout.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29
8  The recent defection of the tribe had, as they well knew themselves, subjected the Delawares to much reproach among their French allies; and they were now made to feel that their future actions were to be regarded with jealousy and distrust.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28
9  The old man made a gesture of resignation, though his rigid features still betrayed his obstinate adherence to a distrust, which he derived from a sort of hereditary contempt of his enemy, rather than from any present signs which might warrant so uncharitable a feeling.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
10  During this display of emotions so natural in their situation, Hawkeye, whose vigilant distrust had satisfied itself that the Hurons, who disfigured the heavenly scene, no longer possessed the power to interrupt its harmony, approached David, and liberated him from the bonds he had, until that moment, endured with the most exemplary patience.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
11  Heyward and his female companions witnessed this mysterious movement with secret uneasiness; for, though the conduct of the white man had hitherto been above reproach, his rude equipments, blunt address, and strong antipathies, together with the character of his silent associates, were all causes for exciting distrust in minds that had been so recently alarmed by Indian treachery.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6