HEYWARD in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper
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 Current Search - Heyward in The Last of the Mohicans
1  The conjecture of Major Heyward was true.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
2  Nay, throw aside that frown, Heyward, and in pity to my longing ears, suffer him to journey in our train.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
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3  Heyward prepared to comply, though with strong disgust at the nature of the office he was compelled to execute.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
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4  Major Heyward was mistaken only in suffering his youthful and generous pride to suppress his active watchfulness.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
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5  "Being little accustomed to the practices of the savages, Alice, you mistake the place of real danger," said Heyward.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
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6  "We will not dispute concerning the excellence of the passage," returned Heyward, smiling; for, as the reader has anticipated, it was he.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
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7  Enough of this," said Heyward, impatiently; "I wish not to inquire into the character of a man that I know, and to whom you must be a stranger.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
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8  The frown which had gathered around the handsome, open, and manly brow of Heyward, gradually relaxed, and his lips curled into a slight smile, as he regarded the stranger.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
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9  Thence he went to the side of the motherly animal, and spending a minute in a fruitless inquiry into the character of her rider, he shook his head and returned to Heyward.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
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10  The Indian muttered a few words in broken English to Heyward, who, in his turn, spoke to the stranger; at once interrupting, and, for the time, closing his musical efforts.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
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11  Heyward, who watched his movements with a vigilant eye, carelessly extricated one of his feet from the stirrup, while he passed a hand toward the bear-skin covering of his holsters.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
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12  In passing his gentler companions Heyward uttered a few words of encouragement, and was pleased to find that, though fatigued with the exercise of the day, they appeared to entertain no suspicion that their present embarrassment was other than the result of accident.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
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13  Leaving the unsuspecting Heyward and his confiding companions to penetrate still deeper into a forest that contained such treacherous inmates, we must use an author's privilege, and shift the scene a few miles to the westward of the place where we have last seen them.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
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14  "I should like to look at the creature; if it is a true Iroquois I can tell him by his knavish look, and by his paint," said the scout; stepping past the charger of Heyward, and entering the path behind the mare of the singing master, whose foal had taken advantage of the halt to exact the maternal contribution.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
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15  The Indian then fastened his eyes keenly on the open countenance of Heyward, but meeting his glance, he turned them quickly away, and seating himself deliberately on the ground, he drew forth the remnant of some former repast, and began to eat, though not without first bending his looks slowly and cautiously around him.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
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16  It would seem that the domestics had been previously instructed; for, instead of penetrating the thicket, they followed the route of the column; a measure which Heyward stated had been dictated by the sagacity of their guide, in order to diminish the marks of their trail, if, haply, the Canadian savages should be lurking so far in advance of their army.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
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17  Perhaps the rapidity of the changes from one of these paces to the other created an optical illusion, which might thus magnify the powers of the beast; for it is certain that Heyward, who possessed a true eye for the merits of a horse, was unable, with his utmost ingenuity, to decide by what sort of movement his pursuer worked his sinuous way on his footsteps with such persevering hardihood.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
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