HAWKEYE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper
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 Current Search - Hawkeye in The Last of the Mohicans
1  In explanation of the taste of Hawkeye, it.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
2  Neither Hawkeye nor the Indians made any reply.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
3  Listen, Hawkeye, and your ear shall drink no lie.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
4  Then, for the first time, Hawkeye was seen to stir.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
5  Hawkeye spoke to him in Delaware, when the young chief took his position with singular caution and undisturbed coolness.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
6  When he ventured to utter this impression to his companions, it was met by Hawkeye with an incredulous shake of the head.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
7  There is nothing to be seen without," continued Hawkeye, shaking his head in discontent; "and our hiding-place is still in darkness.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
8  "The thieves are outlying for scalps and plunder," said the white man, whom we shall call Hawkeye, after the manner of his companions.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
9  'Twould be neglecting a warning that is given for our good to lie hid any longer," said Hawkeye "when such sounds are raised in the forest.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
10  Uncas did as the other had directed, and when the voice of Hawkeye ceased, the roar of the cataract sounded like the rumbling of distant thunder.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
11  In the center of the little island, a few short and stunted pines had found root, forming a thicket, into which Hawkeye darted with the swiftness of a deer, followed by the active Duncan.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
12  David began to utter sounds that would have shocked his delicate organs in more wakeful moments; in short, all but Hawkeye and the Mohicans lost every idea of consciousness, in uncontrollable drowsiness.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
13  When their foes, who had leaped over the black rocks that divided them, with long bounds, uttering the wildest yells, were within a few rods, the rifle of Hawkeye slowly rose among the shrubs, and poured out its fatal contents.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
14  As Hawkeye ceased speaking, four human heads could be seen peering above a few logs of drift-wood that had lodged on these naked rocks, and which had probably suggested the idea of the practicability of the hazardous undertaking.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
15  "Then, Hawkeye," he continued, betraying his deep emotion, only by permitting his voice to fall to those low, guttural tones, which render his language, as spoken at times, so very musical; "then, Hawkeye, we were one people, and we were happy."
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
16  He had just fancied they were cruelly deserted by their scout, as a stream of flame issued from the rock beneath them, and a fierce yell, blended with a shriek of agony, announced that the messenger of death sent from the fatal weapon of Hawkeye, had found a victim.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
17  Come, friend," said Hawkeye, drawing out a keg from beneath a cover of leaves, toward the close of the repast, and addressing the stranger who sat at his elbow, doing great justice to his culinary skill, "try a little spruce; 'twill wash away all thoughts of the colt, and quicken the life in your bosom.'
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
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