MUNRO in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - Munro in The Last of the Mohicans
1  Major Heyward found Munro attended only by his daughters.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
2  The daughter of Munro would draw his water, hoe his corn, and cook his venison.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
3  You would, then, revenge the injury inflicted by Munro on his helpless daughters.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
4  Magua foolishly opened his mouth, and the hot liquor led him into the cabin of Munro.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
5  Munro was pacing his narrow apartment with a disturbed air and gigantic strides as Duncan entered.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
6  From the moment that Munro left his own works to appear in front of his enemy's, his air had been grand, and his step and countenance highly military.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
7  The fidelity of 'The Long Rifle' is well known to me," returned Munro, "and is above suspicion; though his usual good fortune seems, at last, to have failed.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
8  No, sir, thank Heaven we are not yet in such a strait that it can be said Munro is too much pressed to discharge the little domestic duties of his own family.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
9  For several minutes Munro paced the chamber with long and rapid strides, his rigid features working convulsively, and every faculty seemingly absorbed in the musings of his own mind.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
10  Munro, instead of demanding the result of the young man's mission, paced the room for a few moments, with his hands behind his back, and his head inclined toward the floor, like a man lost in thought.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
11  Munro sat utterly unconscious of the other's presence, his features exposed and working with the anguish of his regrets, while heavy tears fell from his eyes, and rolled unheeded from his cheeks to the floor.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
12  A few succeeding days were passed amid the privations, the uproar, and the dangers of the siege, which was vigorously pressed by a power, against whose approaches Munro possessed no competent means of resistance.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
13  The news had been brought, toward the decline of a day in midsummer, by an Indian runner, who also bore an urgent request from Munro, the commander of a work on the shore of the "holy lake," for a speedy and powerful reinforcement.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
14  As Munro listened to the detail of Duncan, the excited feelings of the father gradually gave way before the obligations of his station, and when the other was done, he saw before him nothing but the veteran, swelling with the wounded feelings of a soldier.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
15  As the thoughts of those who are in misery seldom slumber, and the invention is never more lively than when it is stimulated by hope, however feeble and remote, he had even imagined that the parental feelings of Munro were to be made instrumental in seducing him from his duty to the king.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
16  Unwilling to prolong a useless discussion, the young man affected to comply, by posting his back against the logs of the blockhouse, in a half recumbent posture, though resolutely determined, in his own mind, not to close an eye until he had delivered his precious charge into the arms of Munro himself.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
17  Major Heyward," said Munro, turning to his youthful associate with the dignity of his years and superior rank; "I should have served his majesty for half a century, and earned these gray hairs in vain, were I ignorant of all you say, and of the pressing nature of our circumstances; still, there is everything due to the honor of the king's arms, and something to ourselves.
The Last of the Mohicans By James Fenimore Cooper
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.