EQUALITY in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - equality in David Copperfield
1  I was equally at a loss to express my emotions.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 59. RETURN
2  After whom I remember nothing but an average equality of failure.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 44. OUR HOUSEKEEPING
3  In this particular, his influence upon her was equally powerless with mine.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 47. MARTHA
4  Which 'Tom' denied; averring that he should always be equally proud of it, under all circumstances.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 61. I AM SHOWN TWO INTERESTING PENITENTS
5  I could not help laughing again, at his balancing all callings and professions so equally; and I told him so.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23. I CORROBORATE Mr. DICK, AND CHOOSE A ...
6  Anything to equal the low cunning of his visage, and of his shadowless eyes without the ghost of an eyelash, I never saw.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 39. WICKFIELD AND HEEP
7  He being of the same mind, and equally reliant on her, we suffered her to take her own road, and took ours, which was towards Highgate.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 47. MARTHA
8  If we failed to hold our own, because that equal foot at all men's doors was heard knocking somewhere, every object in this world would slip from us.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28. Mr. MICAWBER'S GAUNTLET
9  A curious equality of friendship, originating, I suppose, in our respective circumstances, sprung up between me and these people, notwithstanding the ludicrous disparity in our years.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11. I BEGIN LIFE ON MY OWN ACCOUNT, AND DON'T ...
10  It was a subject of which the affectionate creature never tired; and our interest in hearing the many examples which she, who was so much with him, had to relate, was equal to hers in relating them.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 55. TEMPEST
11  The fly-drivers, among whom I inquired next, were equally jocose and equally disrespectful; and the shopkeepers, not liking my appearance, generally replied, without hearing what I had to say, that they had got nothing for me.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13. THE SEQUEL OF MY RESOLUTION
12  Of this he bequeathed the interest of one thousand to Mr. Peggotty for his life; on his decease, the principal to be equally divided between Peggotty, little Emily, and me, or the survivor or survivors of us, share and share alike.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31. A GREATER LOSS
13  The words were no sooner out of my mouth, than he rattled away as if he, my box, the cart, and the donkey, were all equally mad; and I was quite out of breath with running and calling after him, when I caught him at the place appointed.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12. LIKING LIFE ON MY OWN ACCOUNT NO BETTER, I ...
14  She took so kindly to me, that, in the course of a few weeks, she shortened my adopted name of Trotwood into Trot; and even encouraged me to hope, that if I went on as I had begun, I might take equal rank in her affections with my sister Betsey Trotwood.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15. I MAKE ANOTHER BEGINNING
15  The relish with which Mr. Micawber described himself as a prey to these dismal calamities, was only to be equalled by the emphasis with which he read his letter; and the kind of homage he rendered to it with a roll of his head, when he thought he had hit a sentence very hard indeed.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 52. I ASSIST AT AN EXPLOSION
16  It seemed to be all old nooks and corners; and in every nook and corner there was some queer little table, or cupboard, or bookcase, or seat, or something or other, that made me think there was not such another good corner in the room; until I looked at the next one, and found it equal to it, if not better.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15. I MAKE ANOTHER BEGINNING
17  It reminded me of our old acquaintance; it seemed the natural sequel of it; it showed me that he was unchanged; it relieved me of any uneasiness I might have felt, in comparing my merits with his, and measuring my claims upon his friendship by any equal standard; above all, it was a familiar, unrestrained, affectionate demeanour that he used towards no one else.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21. LITTLE EM'LY