EQUALITY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
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 Current Search - equality in Ivanhoe
1  A Jewish magician might be the subject of equal abhorrence with a Jewish usurer, but he could not be equally despised.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII
2  This was a necessary precaution, in order to secure equality betwixt the two bodies who should be opposed to each other.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
3  "I weigh not these evils," said Rebecca, afraid to provoke the wild knight, yet equally determined neither to endure his passion, nor even feign to endure it.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIX
4  It was not, however, by clamour that the contest was to be decided, and the desperate efforts of the assailants were met by an equally vigorous defence on the part of the besieged.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
5  They then repeated their cry of Largesse, to which Cedric, in the height of his joy, replied by an ample donative, and to which Athelstane, though less promptly, added one equally large.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
6  His companion, who attended on this great personage, had nearly the same dress in all respects, but his extreme deference towards his Superior showed that no other equality subsisted between them.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXV
7  Long they fought equally, until the Miller began to lose temper at finding himself so stoutly opposed, and at hearing the laughter of his companions, who, as usual in such cases, enjoyed his vexation.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
8  Of them all, perhaps, De Bracy least regretted the interruption; for his conference with the Lady Rowena had arrived at a point, where he found it equally difficult to prosecute or to resign his enterprise.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIII
9  Thou be'st thyself more like a thief and a heretic," said the Friar, equally indignant; "I will pouch up no such affront before my parishioners, as thou thinkest it not shame to put upon me, although I be a reverend brother to thee.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
10  His long yellow hair was equally divided on the top of his head and upon his brow, and combed down on each side to the length of his shoulders; it had but little tendency to grey, although Cedric was approaching to his sixtieth year.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
11  A loud shout from the spectators, waving of scarfs and handkerchiefs, and general acclamations, attested the interest taken by the spectators in this encounter; the most equal, as well as the best performed, which had graced the day.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
12  Many knights, who had not sufficient confidence in their own skill to defy a single adversary of high reputation, were, nevertheless, desirous of displaying their valour in the general combat, where they might meet others with whom they were more upon an equality.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
13  In the stranger's third encounter with Sir Philip Malvoisin, he was equally successful; striking that baron so forcibly on the casque, that the laces of the helmet broke, and Malvoisin, only saved from falling by being unhelmeted, was declared vanquished like his companions.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
14  Fourthly, it was announced, that, on the second day, there should be a general tournament, in which all the knights present, who were desirous to win praise, might take part; and being divided into two bands of equal numbers, might fight it out manfully, until the signal was given by Prince John to cease the combat.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
15  All the monarchs of the Norman race had shown the most marked predilection for their Norman subjects; the laws of the chase, and many others equally unknown to the milder and more free spirit of the Saxon constitution, had been fixed upon the necks of the subjugated inhabitants, to add weight, as it were, to the feudal chains with which they were loaded.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
16  The ideas of chivalrous honour, which, amidst his wildness and levity, never utterly abandoned De Bracy, prohibited him from doing the knight any injury in his defenceless condition, and equally interdicted his betraying him to Front-de-Boeuf, who would have had no scruples to put to death, under any circumstances, the rival claimant of the fief of Ivanhoe.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII
17  So saying, the two champions closed together, and for a few minutes they displayed great equality in strength, courage, and skill, intercepting and returning the blows of their adversary with the most rapid dexterity, while, from the continued clatter of their weapons, a person at a distance might have supposed that there were at least six persons engaged on each side.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
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