EYES in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - eyes in David Copperfield
1  I could hardly find the door, through the tears that stood in my eyes.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
2  'Very ready,' said Mrs. Gummidge, shaking her head, and wiping her eyes.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
3  My father's eyes had closed upon the light of this world six months, when mine opened on it.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
4  Miss Murdstone made a jail-delivery of her pocket-handkerchief, and held it before her eyes.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
5  Mrs. Gummidge had never made any other remark than a forlorn sigh, and had never raised her eyes since tea.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
6  The walls were whitewashed as white as milk, and the patchwork counterpane made my eyes quite ache with its brightness.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
7  There, I found my mother, very pale and with red eyes: into whose arms I ran, and begged her pardon from my suffering soul.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
8  At this minute I see him turn round in the garden, and give us a last look with his ill-omened black eyes, before the door was shut.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
9  When we two were left alone, he shut the door, and sitting on a chair, and holding me standing before him, looked steadily into my eyes.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
10  Why you see,' said the waiter, still looking at the light through the tumbler, with one of his eyes shut up, 'our people don't like things being ordered and left.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
11  She took out an old black silk handkerchief and wiped her eyes; but instead of putting it in her pocket, kept it out, and wiped them again, and still kept it out, ready for use.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
12  If, any sunny forenoon, she had spread a little pair of wings and flown away before my eyes, I don't think I should have regarded it as much more than I had had reason to expect.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
13  Miss Betsey, looking round the room, slowly and inquiringly, began on the other side, and carried her eyes on, like a Saracen's Head in a Dutch clock, until they reached my mother.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
14  My opinion is,' said Peggotty, taking her eyes from me, after a little indecision and going on with her work, 'that I never was married myself, Master Davy, and that I don't expect to be.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
15  In time my eyes gradually shut up; and, from seeming to hear the clergyman singing a drowsy song in the heat, I hear nothing, until I fall off the seat with a crash, and am taken out, more dead than alive, by Peggotty.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
16  I was so overcome by this, that I asked the carrier to be so good as to reach me my pocket-handkerchief again; but he said he thought I had better do without it, and I thought I really had, so I wiped my eyes on my sleeve and stopped myself.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
17  I fancied she was jealous even of the saucepan on it; and I have reason to know that she took its impressment into the service of boiling my egg and broiling my bacon, in dudgeon; for I saw her, with my own discomfited eyes, shake her fist at me once, when those culinary operations were going on, and no one else was looking.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
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