FIRE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from King Lear by William Shakespeare
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 Current Search - fire in King Lear
1  Look, here comes a walking fire.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT III
2  Truth's a dog must to kennel; he must be whipped out, when the Lady Brach may stand by the fire and stink.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
3  Thou art a soul in bliss; but I am bound Upon a wheel of fire, that mine own tears Do scald like molten lead.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT IV
4  Now a little fire in a wild field were like an old lecher's heart, a small spark, all the rest on's body cold.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT III
5  Since I was man, Such sheets of fire, such bursts of horrid thunder, Such groans of roaring wind and rain I never Remember to have heard.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT III
6  The sea, with such a storm as his bare head In hell-black night endur'd, would have buoy'd up, And quench'd the stelled fires; Yet, poor old heart, he holp the heavens to rain.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT III
7  Go in with me: my duty cannot suffer T'obey in all your daughters' hard commands; Though their injunction be to bar my doors, And let this tyrannous night take hold upon you, Yet have I ventur'd to come seek you out, And bring you where both fire and food is ready.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT III
8  Such smiling rogues as these, Like rats, oft bite the holy cords a-twain Which are too intrince t'unloose; smooth every passion That in the natures of their lords rebel; Bring oil to fire, snow to their colder moods; Renege, affirm, and turn their halcyon beaks With every gale and vary of their masters, Knowing naught, like dogs, but following.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT II