FORTUNE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - fortune in David Copperfield
1  My dear, we will not anticipate the decrees of fortune.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36. ENTHUSIASM
2  He repaid her by breaking her fortune, and nearly breaking her heart.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 47. MARTHA
3  But, by good fortune the greenhouse was not far off, and these words brought us to it.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26. I FALL INTO CAPTIVITY
4  I had advanced in fame and fortune, my domestic joy was perfect, I had been married ten happy years.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 63. A VISITOR
5  It is Sophy's birthday; and, on our road, Traddles discourses to me of the good fortune he has enjoyed.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 64. A LAST RETROSPECT
6  As to marriage, and fortune, and all that, I believe I was almost as innocently undesigning then, as when I loved little Em'ly.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26. I FALL INTO CAPTIVITY
7  We were so fortunate as to find one, of a very clean and cheap description, over a chandler's shop, only two streets removed from me.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32. THE BEGINNING OF A LONG JOURNEY
8  It was fortunate he had proceeded so far with his mystery, for we heard the coach stop at the little garden gate, which brought my aunt and Dora home.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 45. MR. DICK FULFILS MY AUNT'S PREDICTIONS
9  His old simple character and good temper, and something of his old unlucky fortune also, I thought, smiled at me in the smile with which he made this explanation.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27. TOMMY TRADDLES
10  I am living by the sort of work I have mentioned, still, and I hope, one of these days, to get connected with some newspaper: which would almost be the making of my fortune.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27. TOMMY TRADDLES
11  Among the persons who are attracted to me in my rising fame and fortune,' said I, looking over my letters, 'and who discover that they were always much attached to me, is the self-same Creakle.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 61. I AM SHOWN TWO INTERESTING PENITENTS
12  She seemed to think she had quite settled the question, and gave me such a triumphant little kiss, direct from her innocent heart, that I would hardly have put her out of conceit with her answer, for a fortune.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37. A LITTLE COLD WATER
13  And it was very fortunate, with a view to his credit, that she did so; for I am confident that I detected him at that moment in the act of making preparations to stand on one leg, as an appropriate expression of delight.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 45. MR. DICK FULFILS MY AUNT'S PREDICTIONS
14  It was wonderful to see his face shining at us out of a thin cloud of these delicate fumes, as he stirred, and mixed, and tasted, and looked as if he were making, instead of punch, a fortune for his family down to the latest posterity.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28. Mr. MICAWBER'S GAUNTLET
15  Some happy talent, and some fortunate opportunity, may form the two sides of the ladder on which some men mount, but the rounds of that ladder must be made of stuff to stand wear and tear; and there is no substitute for thorough-going, ardent, and sincere earnestness.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42. MISCHIEF
16  If I had permitted him, I am satisfied that Traddles would have made a perfect savage of himself, and eaten a plateful of raw meat, to express enjoyment of the repast; but I would hear of no such immolation on the altar of friendship, and we had a course of bacon instead; there happening, by good fortune, to be cold bacon in the larder.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 44. OUR HOUSEKEEPING
17  I have been very fortunate in worldly matters; many men have worked much harder, and not succeeded half so well; but I never could have done what I have done, without the habits of punctuality, order, and diligence, without the determination to concentrate myself on one object at a time, no matter how quickly its successor should come upon its heels, which I then formed.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42. MISCHIEF
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