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Quotes from Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius by Niccolo Machiavelli
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 Current Search - hazard in Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius
1  But lacking money, and fearing that on that account his soldiers might desert him, he was forced to hazard an engagement.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X.
2  Further, we have to note that there is no more hazardous or less useful defence than one conducted without method or system.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XXX.
3  And because it appeared to them, as I have said, that their desire was a reasonable one, they were resolved to satisfy it at all hazards.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XLVII.
4  For the truth of the matter is, that a captain who would keep the field, cannot decline battle when his adversary forces it on him at all hazards.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X.
5  For although this last may sometimes, as in the case of Rome, afford an efficacious remedy, it is too hazardous a remedy to make us ever wish to employ it.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I.
6  For the reasons now given, a conspiracy against a single ruler may readily break down in its execution; but a conspiracy against two rulers is not only difficult, but so hazardous that its success is almost hopeless.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI.
7  But being afterwards made consul and sent to oppose Hannibal, he took the course mentioned above, which was in itself so hazardous that all Rome was filled with doubt and anxiety until tidings came of Hasdrubal's defeat.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XVII.
8  Resolving, nevertheless, to take the shortest road at all hazards, he waited till his men were already on their march before signifying to the marquis that he desired leave to pass through his country, so that no time might be left him to deliberate.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XLIV.
9  On the other hand, since conspiracies are attended at every stage by difficulties and dangers, no more hazardous or desperate undertakings can be engaged in by any private citizen; whence it comes that while many conspiracies are planned, few effect their object.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI.
10  Perceiving, therefore, that this was the last stake his country had to play, and not choosing to hazard it until he had tried every other expedient, he felt no shame to sue for peace, judging that in peace rather than in war lay the best hope of safety for his country.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXVII.
11  So that an engagement was avoided as much by Hannibal as by Fabius, since if either had been minded to fight at all hazards the other would have been constrained to take one of three courses, that is to say, one or other of the two just now mentioned, or else to retreat.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X.
12  But perceiving that by protracting the war in this way, his condition grew constantly worse, while his subjects suffered grievously, now from his own troops, at another time from those of the enemy, he at last resolved to hazard battle, and so came to a regular engagement with the Romans.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X.
13  We find also, as in the case of Hasdrubal when beset, in the March of Ancona, at once by Claudius Nero and by the other Roman consul, that a captain, when he must either fight or fly, will always fight, since it will seem to him that by this course, however hazardous, he has at least a chance of victory, while by the other his ruin is certain.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X.