HEAD in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
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 Current Search - head in Frankenstein
1  Justine shook her head mournfully.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 8
2  I was guiltless, but I had indeed drawn down a horrible curse upon my head, as mortal as that of crime.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 19
3  In one corner, near a small fire, sat an old man, leaning his head on his hands in a disconsolate attitude.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 11
4  Uttering a few sounds with an air of melancholy, he took the pail from her head and bore it to the cottage himself.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 11
5  Her hair was the brightest living gold, and despite the poverty of her clothing, seemed to set a crown of distinction on her head.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 1
6  I wished to see him again, that I might wreak the utmost extent of abhorrence on his head and avenge the deaths of William and Justine.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 9
7  I quitted my seat, and walked on, although the darkness and storm increased every minute, and the thunder burst with a terrific crash over my head.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 7
8  We entered the gloomy prison chamber and beheld Justine sitting on some straw at the farther end; her hands were manacled, and her head rested on her knees.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 8
9  I now also began to collect the materials necessary for my new creation, and this was to me like the torture of single drops of water continually falling on the head.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 19
10  The same lulling sounds acted as a lullaby to my too keen sensations; when I placed my head upon my pillow, sleep crept over me; I felt it as it came and blessed the giver of oblivion.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 9
11  He appeared about fifty years of age, but with an aspect expressive of the greatest benevolence; a few grey hairs covered his temples, but those at the back of his head were nearly black.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 3
12  She had been moved from the posture in which I had first beheld her, and now, as she lay, her head upon her arm and a handkerchief thrown across her face and neck, I might have supposed her asleep.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 23
13  A youngster who, but a few years ago, believed in Cornelius Agrippa as firmly as in the gospel, has now set himself at the head of the university; and if he is not soon pulled down, we shall all be out of countenance.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 6
14  I ate my breakfast with pleasure and was about to remove a plank to procure myself a little water when I heard a step, and looking through a small chink, I beheld a young creature, with a pail on her head, passing before my hovel.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 11
15  I attempted to accompany them and proceeded a short distance from the house, but my head whirled round, my steps were like those of a drunken man, I fell at last in a state of utter exhaustion; a film covered my eyes, and my skin was parched with the heat of fever.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 23
16  The path, as you ascend higher, is intersected by ravines of snow, down which stones continually roll from above; one of them is particularly dangerous, as the slightest sound, such as even speaking in a loud voice, produces a concussion of air sufficient to draw destruction upon the head of the speaker.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 10
17  I trembled from head to foot; I felt a presentiment of who it was and wished to rouse one of the peasants who dwelt in a cottage not far from mine; but I was overcome by the sensation of helplessness, so often felt in frightful dreams, when you in vain endeavour to fly from an impending danger, and was rooted to the spot.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 20
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