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Quotes of HOPE from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens

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The Orfling met me here sometimes, to be told some astonishing fictions respecting the wharves and the Tower; of which I can say no more than that I hope I believed them myself.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 11. I BEGIN LIFE ON MY OWN ACCOUNT, AND DON'T LIK   Context
Dick, not only inspired my young breast with some selfish hope for myself, but warmed it unselfishly towards her.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 14. MY AUNT MAKES UP HER MIND ABOUT ME   Context
The remembrance of that life is fraught with so much pain to me, with so much mental suffering and want of hope, that I have never had the courage even to examine how long I was doomed to lead it.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 14. MY AUNT MAKES UP HER MIND ABOUT ME   Context
At length I begged him, with all the earnestness I felt, to tell me what had occurred to cross him so unusually, and to let me sympathize with him, if I could not hope to advise him.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 22. SOME OLD SCENES, AND SOME NEW PEOPLE   Context
Surely there are some ways in which I might begin life with hardly any outlay, and yet begin with a good hope of getting on by resolution and exertion.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 23. I CORROBORATE Mr. DICK, AND CHOOSE A PROFESSI   Context
I felt then, more than ever, that she was my better Angel; and if I thought of her sweet face and placid smile, as though they had shone on me from some removed being, like an Angel, I hope I thought no harm.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 25. GOOD AND BAD ANGELS   Context
I rest a good deal of hope on her observing how useful I am to her father (for I trust to be very useful to him indeed, Master Copperfield), and how I smooth the way for him, and keep him straight.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 25. GOOD AND BAD ANGELS   Context
Spenlow went home without me (I had had an insane hope that he might take me back again), as if I were a mariner myself, and the ship to which I belonged had sailed away and left me on a desert island; I shall make no fruitless effort to describe.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 26. I FALL INTO CAPTIVITY   Context
And yet, wretched cripple as I made myself by this act of homage to Dora, I walked miles upon miles daily in the hope of seeing her.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 26. I FALL INTO CAPTIVITY   Context
I am living by the sort of work I have mentioned, still, and I hope, one of these days, to get connected with some newspaper: which would almost be the making of my fortune.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 27. TOMMY TRADDLES   Context
Some flickering efforts to spare you the premature knowledge of his calamitous position, you may observe in him this day; but hope has sunk beneath the horizon, and the undersigned is Crushed.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 28. Mr. MICAWBER'S GAUNTLET   Context
I said he was a man in very common life, but of a most gentle and upright character; and that I ventured to express a hope that she would not refuse to see him in his heavy trouble.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 32. THE BEGINNING OF A LONG JOURNEY   Context
As if, in love, joy, sorrow, hope, or disappointment; in all emotions; my heart turned naturally there, and found its refuge and best friend.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 34. MY AUNT ASTONISHES ME   Context
I had a hope that this brisk treatment might freshen my wits a little; and I think it did them good, for I soon came to the conclusion that the first step I ought to take was, to try if my articles could be cancelled and the premium recovered.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 35. DEPRESSION   Context
But if any fraud or treachery is practising against him, I hope that simple love and truth will be strong in the end.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 35. DEPRESSION   Context
Copperfield, I hope that you will not render it necessary for me to open, even for a quarter of an hour, that closed page in the book of life, and unsettle, even for a quarter of an hour, grave affairs long since composed.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 38. A DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP   Context
Between these two proud persons, mother and son, there is a wider breach than before, and little hope of its healing, for they are one at heart, and time makes each more obstinate and imperious.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 46. INTELLIGENCE   Context
All the way here, I had supposed that she was going to some house; indeed, I had vaguely entertained the hope that the house might be in some way associated with the lost girl.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 47. MARTHA   Context
Knowing that this state must pass, before we could speak to her with any hope, I ventured to restrain him when he would have raised her, and we stood by in silence until she became more tranquil.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 47. MARTHA   Context
That she would never waver in it, never be diverted from it, never relinquish it, while there was any chance of hope.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 47. MARTHA   Context
If any good should come of me, I might begin to hope; for nothing but harm has ever come of my deeds yet.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 47. MARTHA   Context
Micawber rushed out of the house; leaving us in a state of excitement, hope, and wonder, that reduced us to a condition little better than his own.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 49. I AM INVOLVED IN MYSTERY   Context
Now much disturbed, and dazzled with conflicting gleams of hope and dread, I looked at her for some explanation.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 50. Mr. PEGGOTTY'S DREAM COMES TRUE   Context
I have tried to resign myself, and to console myself; and that, I hope, I may have done imperfectly; but what I cannot firmly settle in my mind is, that the end will absolutely come.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 53. ANOTHER RETROSPECT   Context
From my swoon, I first awoke to a consciousness of her compassionate tears, her words of hope and peace, her gentle face bending down as from a purer region nearer Heaven, over my undisciplined heart, and softening its pain.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 54. Mr. MICAWBER'S TRANSACTIONS   Context
As I sat beside the bed, when hope was abandoned and all was done, a fisherman, who had known me when Emily and I were children, and ever since, whispered my name at the door.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 55. TEMPEST   Context
By this time, I quite gave Traddles up for lost; and settled in my own mind that there was no hope for him.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 59. RETURN   Context
I cannot say that I was yet quite happy, in the hope that I was gaining a victory over myself; even in the prospect of so soon looking on her face again.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 60. AGNES   Context
Without my knowing why, these tears allied themselves with the quietly sad smile which was so fixed in my remembrance, and shook me more with hope than fear or sorrow.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 62. A LIGHT SHINES ON MY WAY   Context
Her tears fell fast; but they were not like those she had lately shed, and I saw my hope brighten in them.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 62. A LIGHT SHINES ON MY WAY   Context
But, in the absence of any such miraculous provision, my desire was to apply myself to some pursuit that would not lie too heavily upon her purse; and to do my duty in it, whatever it might be.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 19. I LOOK ABOUT ME, AND MAKE A DISCOVERY   Context
I had a new pride in my rooms after his approval of them, and burned with a desire to develop their utmost resources.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 24. MY FIRST DISSIPATION   Context
It was sad to see him struggling between his desire to represent it to me as a matter of choice on his part, and his inability to conceal that it was forced upon him.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 25. GOOD AND BAD ANGELS   Context
I was in several minds how to dress myself on the important day; being divided between my desire to appear to advantage, and my apprehensions of putting on anything that might impair my severely practical character in the eyes of the Misses Spenlow.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 41. DORA'S AUNTS   Context
Miss Lavinia was going on to make some rejoinder, when Miss Clarissa, who appeared to be incessantly beset by a desire to refer to her brother Francis, struck in again:.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 41. DORA'S AUNTS   Context
I advised my companion, therefore, that we should not address her yet, but follow her; consulting in this, likewise, an indistinct desire I had, to know where she went.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 46. INTELLIGENCE   Context
She might desire, I thought, after receiving my communication, to send some parting word by me to her unhappy lover.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 55. TEMPEST   Context
If my family are at length sensible of the deprivation to which their own conduct has, in the past, exposed them, and now desire to extend the hand of fellowship, let it not be repulsed.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 57. THE EMIGRANTS   Context
With the unerring instinct of her noble heart, she touched the chords of my memory so softly and harmoniously, that not one jarred within me; I could listen to the sorrowful, distant music, and desire to shrink from nothing it awoke.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 60. AGNES   Context
Micawber may have concealed his difficulties from me in the first instance, but his sanguine temper may have led him to expect that he would overcome them.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 12. LIKING LIFE ON MY OWN ACCOUNT NO BETTER, I FO   Context
He mentioned a terrace at the western end of Oxford Street, fronting Hyde Park, on which he had always had his eye, but which he did not expect to attain immediately, as it would require a large establishment.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 28. Mr. MICAWBER'S GAUNTLET   Context
Merely telling him that I should expect from him what I always had expected, and had never yet been disappointed in, I opened the door upon him, as if he had been a great walnut put there to be cracked, and went out of the house.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 42. MISCHIEF   Context
It was such an early day that it came soon, even to me, who was in a fever of expectation, and half afraid that an earthquake or a fiery mountain, or some other great convulsion of nature, might interpose to stop the expedition.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE   Context
I remained, therefore, in a state of considerable expectation until the cloth had been removed some half an hour, and we were sitting over our decanter of wine before the fire, when the door opened, and Littimer, with his habitual serenity quite undisturbed, announced:.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 22. SOME OLD SCENES, AND SOME NEW PEOPLE   Context
I remarked this in Peggotty, too, when she came down; and I have seen it since; and I think, in the expectation of that dread surprise, all other changes and surprises dwindle into nothing.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 30. A LOSS   Context
Traddles still remained, perhaps, but it was very doubtful; and I had not sufficient confidence in his discretion or good luck, however strong my reliance was on his good nature, to wish to trust him with my situation.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 13. THE SEQUEL OF MY RESOLUTION   Context
I construed this remark into an indication of a wish that he should have my place, so I blushingly offered to resign it.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 19. I LOOK ABOUT ME, AND MAKE A DISCOVERY   Context
Crupp said, would leave her at full liberty to concentrate her mind on the potatoes, and to serve up the cheese and celery as she could wish to see it done.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 24. MY FIRST DISSIPATION   Context
In keeping Peggotty company, and doing all I could for her (little enough at the utmost), I was as grateful, I rejoice to think, as even now I could wish myself to have been.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 31. A GREATER LOSS   Context
How I had a grasping, avaricious wish to shut out everybody from her but myself, and to be all in all to her, at that unseasonable time of all times.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 38. A DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP   Context
At first, she seemed to wonder at the gentle compassion with which the Doctor spoke to her, and at his wish that she should have her mother with her, to relieve the dull monotony of her life.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 42. MISCHIEF   Context
James would encourage the receipt of letters likely to increase low spirits and unpleasantness; but further than that, sir, I should wish to avoid going.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 46. INTELLIGENCE   Context
The slightest provocation, even being asked if there is anything he would prefer for dinner, causes him to express a wish for a separation.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 49. I AM INVOLVED IN MYSTERY   Context
As I had a sorrowful wish to see the old place once more, before it was locked up, I engaged to meet them there in the evening.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 51. THE BEGINNING OF A LONGER JOURNEY   Context
I am bound to say that she has never done much for me, and that I have no particular wish upon the subject.
Charles Dickens
David Copperfield, CHAPTER 57. THE EMIGRANTS   Context
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