HOPE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
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 Current Search - hope in Frankenstein
1  Your arrival, my dear cousin," said she, "fills me with hope.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 7
2  You have hope, and the world before you, and have no cause for despair.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Letter 4
3  I commit my cause to the justice of my judges, yet I see no room for hope.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 8
4  I eagerly hope that you will confirm this intelligence soon in your own handwriting.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 6
5  But I, the true murderer, felt the never-dying worm alive in my bosom, which allowed of no hope or consolation.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 8
6  Sometimes, on the very brink of certainty, I failed; yet still I clung to the hope which the next day or the next hour might realize.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 4
7  He lost no time in endeavouring to seek him out, with the hope of persuading him to begin the world again through his credit and assistance.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 1
8  You seek for knowledge and wisdom, as I once did; and I ardently hope that the gratification of your wishes may not be a serpent to sting you, as mine has been.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Letter 4
9  One secret which I alone possessed was the hope to which I had dedicated myself; and the moon gazed on my midnight labours, while, with unrelaxed and breathless eagerness, I pursued nature to her hiding-places.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 4
10  Nothing is more painful to the human mind than, after the feelings have been worked up by a quick succession of events, the dead calmness of inaction and certainty which follows and deprives the soul both of hope and fear.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 9
11  He knew that I could not have a more kind and attentive nurse than himself; and, firm in the hope he felt of my recovery, he did not doubt that, instead of doing harm, he performed the kindest action that he could towards them.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 5
12  No one did at first; but several circumstances came out, that have almost forced conviction upon us; and her own behaviour has been so confused, as to add to the evidence of facts a weight that, I fear, leaves no hope for doubt.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 7
13  The busy stage of life, the virtues of heroes, and the actions of men were his theme; and his hope and his dream was to become one among those whose names are recorded in story as the gallant and adventurous benefactors of our species.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 2
14  You come to us now to share a misery which nothing can alleviate; yet your presence will, I hope, revive our father, who seems sinking under his misfortune; and your persuasions will induce poor Elizabeth to cease her vain and tormenting self-accusations.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 7
15  I see by your eagerness and the wonder and hope which your eyes express, my friend, that you expect to be informed of the secret with which I am acquainted; that cannot be; listen patiently until the end of my story, and you will easily perceive why I am reserved upon that subject.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 4
16  I was easily led by the sympathy which he evinced to use the language of my heart, to give utterance to the burning ardour of my soul and to say, with all the fervour that warmed me, how gladly I would sacrifice my fortune, my existence, my every hope, to the furtherance of my enterprise.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Letter 4
17  I prepared myself for a multitude of reverses; my operations might be incessantly baffled, and at last my work be imperfect, yet when I considered the improvement which every day takes place in science and mechanics, I was encouraged to hope my present attempts would at least lay the foundations of future success.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 4
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