HOPE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - hope in Oliver Twist
1  'I hope so,' replied the child.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
2  They talked of hope and comfort.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
3  'I hope not, sir,' said Mrs. Bedwin.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
4  'I hope not,' rejoined the old gentleman.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIV
5  'I hope I am, sir,' said Mr. Gamfield, with an ugly leer.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
6  'Yes, sir, I hope so,' faltered Mr. Giles, who had turned very pale.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXX
7  I hope you don't mean to say, sir,' said Mr. Giles, trembling, 'that he's going to die.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXX
8  Oliver turned, for an instant, when they reached the door, in the hope of meeting a look from the girl.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XX
9  Oliver rose next morning, in better heart, and went about his usual occupations, with more hope and pleasure than he had known for many days.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIV
10  I only hope this'll teach master not to have any more of these dreadful creatures, that are born to be murderers and robbers from their very cradle.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
11  If your answer be what I almost dare to hope it is,' retorted Harry, 'it will shed a gleam of happiness upon my lonely way, and light the path before me.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXV
12  I have no thought, no view, no hope in life, beyond her; and if you oppose me in this great stake, you take my peace and happiness in your hands, and cast them to the wind.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIV
13  On the day following, Oliver and Mr. Maylie repaired to the market-town, in the hope of seeing or hearing something of the men there; but this effort was equally fruitless.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXV
14  I was brought here, by the most dreadful and agonising of all apprehensions,' said the young man; 'the fear of losing the one dear being on whom my every wish and hope are fixed.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXV
15  He had diminished the distance between himself and London by full four miles more, before he recollected how much he must undergo ere he could hope to reach his place of destination.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
16  I had forgotten it for a moment, Oliver, but I hope I may be pardoned, for I am old, and have seen enough of illness and death to know the agony of separation from the objects of our love.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
17  He was still too weak to get up to breakfast; but, when he came down into the housekeeper's room next day, his first act was to cast an eager glance at the wall, in the hope of again looking on the face of the beautiful lady.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIV
18  The doctor then communicated, in reply to multifarious questions from his young friend, a precise account of his patient's situation; which was quite as consolatory and full of promise, as Oliver's statement had encouraged him to hope; and to the whole of which, Mr. Giles, who affected to be busy about the luggage, listened with greedy ears.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIV
19  By the time he had got upon his legs, the Jew had disappeared; so Mr. Lively, after ineffectually standing on tiptoe, in the hope of catching sight of him, again forced himself into the little chair, and, exchanging a shake of the head with a lady in the opposite shop, in which doubt and mistrust were plainly mingled, resumed his pipe with a grave demeanour.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVI
20  With many interruptions, and repeated insults, Mr. Brownlow contrived to state his case; observing that, in the surprise of the moment, he had run after the boy because he had saw him running away; and expressing his hope that, if the magistrate should believe him, although not actually the thief, to be connected with the thieves, he would deal as leniently with him as justice would allow.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI