HORSE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
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 Current Search - horse in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
1  In about five or ten minutes here comes Boggs again, but not on his horse.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXI.
2  Then the men see them, and jumped on their horses and took out after them.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII.
3  We better camp here if we can find a good place; the horses is about beat out.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII.
4  One day Buck and me was away out in the woods hunting, and heard a horse coming.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII.
5  Pretty soon a splendid young man come galloping down the road, setting his horse easy and looking like a soldier.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII.
6  It was a dirty, littered-up place, and had ink marks, and handbills with pictures of horses and runaway niggers on them, all over the walls.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XX.
7  The old gentleman was for going along with me, but I said no, I could drive the horse myself, and I druther he wouldn't take no trouble about me.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII.
8  All the men jumped off of their horses and grabbed the hurt one and started to carry him to the store; and that minute the two boys started on the run.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII.
9  I went out in the woods and cooked a supper, and I had about made up my mind I would stay there all night when I hear a plunkety-plunk, plunkety-plunk, and says to myself, horses coming; and next I hear people's voices.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII.
10  So, then, the ringmaster he made a little speech, and said he hoped there wouldn't be no disturbance, and if the man would promise he wouldn't make no more trouble he would let him ride if he thought he could stay on the horse.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII.
11  The Shepherdsons and Grangerfords used the same steamboat landing, which was about two mile above our house; so sometimes when I went up there with a lot of our folks I used to see a lot of the Shepherdsons there on their fine horses.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII.
12  There was four or five men cavorting around on their horses in the open place before the log store, cussing and yelling, and trying to get at a couple of young chaps that was behind the wood-rank alongside of the steamboat landing; but they couldn't come it.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII.
13  They was all a-horseback; he lit off of his horse and got behind a little woodpile, and kep his horse before him to stop the bullets; but the Grangerfords stayed on their horses and capered around the old man, and peppered away at him, and he peppered away at them.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII.
14  They was all a-horseback; he lit off of his horse and got behind a little woodpile, and kep his horse before him to stop the bullets; but the Grangerfords stayed on their horses and capered around the old man, and peppered away at him, and he peppered away at them.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII.
15  He was well born, as the saying is, and that's worth as much in a man as it is in a horse, so the Widow Douglas said, and nobody ever denied that she was of the first aristocracy in our town; and pap he always said it, too, though he warn't no more quality than a mudcat himself.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII.
16  The minute he was on, the horse begun to rip and tear and jump and cavort around, with two circus men hanging on to his bridle trying to hold him, and the drunk man hanging on to his neck, and his heels flying in the air every jump, and the whole crowd of people standing up shouting and laughing till tears rolled down.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII.
17  And at last, sure enough, all the circus men could do, the horse broke loose, and away he went like the very nation, round and round the ring, with that sot laying down on him and hanging to his neck, with first one leg hanging most to the ground on one side, and then t'other one on t'other side, and the people just crazy.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII.
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