HORSE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - horse in David Copperfield
1  'Then come up,' said the carrier to the lazy horse; who came up accordingly.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
2  Again he made up his mouth to whistle, and again he didn't whistle, but sat looking at the horse's ears.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
3  He sat looking at the horse's ears, as if he saw something new there; and sat so, for a considerable time.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
4  'I hope your poor horse was not tired, when he got home at night,' said Dora, lifting up her beautiful eyes.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33. BLISSFUL
5  The carrier, seeing me in this resolution, proposed that my pocket-handkerchief should be spread upon the horse's back to dry.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
6  As soon as I and my box were in the cart, and the carrier seated, the lazy horse walked away with us all at his accustomed pace.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. MY HOLIDAYS. ESPECIALLY ONE HAPPY AFTERNOON
7  I remember it as a kind of half chaise-cart, half pianoforte-van, painted of a sombre colour, and drawn by a black horse with a long tail.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9. I HAVE A MEMORABLE BIRTHDAY
8  So, when they stopped to bait the horse, and ate and drank and enjoyed themselves, I could touch nothing that they touched, but kept my fast unbroken.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9. I HAVE A MEMORABLE BIRTHDAY
9  The carrier had a way of keeping his head down, like his horse, and of drooping sleepily forward as he drove, with one of his arms on each of his knees.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
10  The carrier's horse was the laziest horse in the world, I should hope, and shuffled along, with his head down, as if he liked to keep people waiting to whom the packages were directed.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
11  The air was so clear and pleasant, and the horse seemed to like the idea of the ride so much himself, as he stood snorting and pawing at the garden-gate, that I had a great desire to go.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
12  Miss Murdstone was good enough to take me out to the cart, and to say on the way that she hoped I would repent, before I came to a bad end; and then I got into the cart, and the lazy horse walked off with it.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
13  He reined up his horse to salute my mother, and said he was going to Lowestoft to see some friends who were there with a yacht, and merrily proposed to take me on the saddle before him if I would like the ride.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
14  Away we went, however, on our holiday excursion; and the first thing we did was to stop at a church, where Mr. Barkis tied the horse to some rails, and went in with Peggotty, leaving little Em'ly and me alone in the chaise.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. I BECOME NEGLECTED, AND AM PROVIDED FOR
15  A gentleman on horseback came to the gate, and leading his horse into the little court, with the bridle over his arm, as if he were quite at home, tied him to a ring in the empty coach-house wall, and came into the breakfast parlour, whip in hand.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36. ENTHUSIASM
16  So I was sent upstairs to Peggotty to be made spruce; and in the meantime Mr. Murdstone dismounted, and, with his horse's bridle drawn over his arm, walked slowly up and down on the outer side of the sweetbriar fence, while my mother walked slowly up and down on the inner to keep him company.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
17  Turning upon me a lustreless eye, that reminded me of a long-forgotten blind old horse who once used to crop the grass, and tumble over the graves, in Blunderstone churchyard, he said he was glad to see me: and then he gave me his hand; which I didn't know what to do with, as it did nothing for itself.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. I AM A NEW BOY IN MORE SENSES THAN ONE
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