HOUSE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - house in David Copperfield
1  I make the house uncomfortable.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
2  I had better go into the house and die.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
3  You never saw such a good house, Steerforth.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7. MY 'FIRST HALF' AT SALEM HOUSE
4  'About keeping house, for instance,' said Miss Betsey.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
5  When she reached the house, she gave another proof of her identity.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
6  We were going up to the house, among some dark heavy trees, when he called after my conductor.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
7  My house ain't much for to see, sir, but it's hearty at your service if ever you should come along with Mas'r Davy to see it.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7. MY 'FIRST HALF' AT SALEM HOUSE
8  I looked in all directions, as far as I could stare over the wilderness, and away at the sea, and away at the river, but no house could I make out.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
9  I did not feel, at first, that I knew him as well as he knew me, because he had never come to our house since the night I was born, and naturally he had the advantage of me.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
10  One day when Mr. Creakle kept the house from indisposition, which naturally diffused a lively joy through the school, there was a good deal of noise in the course of the morning's work.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7. MY 'FIRST HALF' AT SALEM HOUSE
11  And if Mr. Steerforth ever comes into Norfolk or Suffolk, Mr. Peggotty,' I said, 'while I am there, you may depend upon it I shall bring him to Yarmouth, if he will let me, to see your house.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7. MY 'FIRST HALF' AT SALEM HOUSE
12  The coach jolts, I wake with a start, and the flute has come back again, and the Master at Salem House is sitting with his legs crossed, playing it dolefully, while the old woman of the house looks on delighted.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
13  And now I see the outside of our house, with the latticed bedroom-windows standing open to let in the sweet-smelling air, and the ragged old rooks'-nests still dangling in the elm-trees at the bottom of the front garden.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
14  One thing I particularly noticed in this delightful house, was the smell of fish; which was so searching, that when I took out my pocket-handkerchief to wipe my nose, I found it smelt exactly as if it had wrapped up a lobster.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
15  To hear the wind getting up out at sea, to know that the fog was creeping over the desolate flat outside, and to look at the fire, and think that there was no house near but this one, and this one a boat, was like enchantment.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
16  On the walls there were some common coloured pictures, framed and glazed, of scripture subjects; such as I have never seen since in the hands of pedlars, without seeing the whole interior of Peggotty's brother's house again, at one view.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
17  After dinner, when we were sitting by the fire, and I was meditating an escape to Peggotty without having the hardihood to slip away, lest it should offend the master of the house, a coach drove up to the garden-gate and he went out to receive the visitor.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
18  Mr. Creakle's part of the house was a good deal more comfortable than ours, and he had a snug bit of garden that looked pleasant after the dusty playground, which was such a desert in miniature, that I thought no one but a camel, or a dromedary, could have felt at home in it.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6. I ENLARGE MY CIRCLE OF ACQUAINTANCE
19  I dreamed, I thought, that once while he was blowing into this dismal flute, the old woman of the house, who had gone nearer and nearer to him in her ecstatic admiration, leaned over the back of his chair and gave him an affectionate squeeze round the neck, which stopped his playing for a moment.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
20  I am not certain whether I found out then, or afterwards, that, without being actively concerned in any business, he had some share in, or some annual charge upon the profits of, a wine-merchant's house in London, with which his family had been connected from his great-grandfather's time, and in which his sister had a similar interest; but I may mention it in this place, whether or no.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE