HUMILIATION in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Trial by Franz Kafka
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 Current Search - humiliation in The Trial
1  It was almost humiliating even for the onlooker.
The Trial By Franz Kafka
Get Context   In Chapter Eight Block, the businessman - Dismissing the ...
2  And after all, he had no wish at all to humiliate himself before the committee by being too punctual.
The Trial By Franz Kafka
Get Context   In Chapter Two First Cross-examination
3  gave his oration, and it had not been possible to raise them from this passivity even when the judge was being humiliated.
The Trial By Franz Kafka
Get Context   In Chapter Two First Cross-examination
4  And that everyone you know would be pulled down with you or at the very least humiliated, disgraced right down to the ground.
The Trial By Franz Kafka
Get Context   In Chapter Six K.'s uncle - Leni
5  s experience of them so far, that even seemed probable, except that if the court were allowed to decay in that way it would not just humiliate the accused but also give him more encouragement than if the court were simply in a state of poverty.
The Trial By Franz Kafka
Get Context   In Chapter Three In the empty Courtroom - The Student - The ...
6  That is why policemen try to steal the clothes off the back of those they arrest, that is why supervisors break into the homes of people they do not know, that is why innocent people are humiliated in front of crowds rather than being given a proper trial.
The Trial By Franz Kafka
Get Context   In Chapter Two First Cross-examination
7  The judge grabbed the notebook from where it had fallen on the desk - which could only have been a sign of his deep humiliation, or at least that is how it must have been perceived - tried to tidy it up a little, and held it once more in front of himself in order to read from it.
The Trial By Franz Kafka
Get Context   In Chapter Two First Cross-examination