JOY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
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 Current Search - joy in Uncle Tom's Cabin
1  A burst of joy from the little Quakeress interrupted the speech.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
2  "Well, now, there's Michael, and Stephen and Amariah," exclaimed Phineas, joyfully.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
3  "I believe him, and in a few days I shall see him;" and the young face grew fervent, radiant with joy.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVI
4  But, to return to our friends, whom we left wiping their eyes, and recovering themselves from too great and sudden a joy.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLIII
5  At this moment, the sudden flush of strength which the joy of meeting his young master had infused into the dying man gave way.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLI
6  In the very depth of physical suffering, bowed by brutal oppression, this question shot a gleam of joy and triumph through Tom's soul.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
7  Several times she appeared suddenly among them, with her hands full of candy, nuts, and oranges, which she would distribute joyfully to them, and then be gone again.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIV
8  He felt the muscles of his brawny arms with a sort of joy, as he thought they would soon belong to himself, and how much they could do to work out the freedom of his family.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII
9  A crowd of servants now pressed to the entry door, and among them a middle-aged mulatto woman, of very respectable appearance, stood foremost, in a tremor of expectation and joy, at the door.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
10  To him it seemed as if his life-sorrows were now over, and as if, out of that strange treasury of peace and joy, with which he had been endowed from above, he longed to pour out something for the relief of their woes.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVIII
11  There are in this world blessed souls, whose sorrows all spring up into joys for others; whose earthly hopes, laid in the grave with many tears, are the seed from which spring healing flowers and balm for the desolate and the distressed.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
12  When he came to himself, the fire was gone out, his clothes were wet with the chill and drenching dews; but the dread soul-crisis was past, and, in the joy that filled him, he no longer felt hunger, cold, degradation, disappointment, wretchedness.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVIII
13  It was like that hush of spirit which we feel amid the bright, mild woods of autumn, when the bright hectic flush is on the trees, and the last lingering flowers by the brook; and we joy in it all the more, because we know that soon it will all pass away.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVI
14  When a heavy weight presses the soul to the lowest level at which endurance is possible, there is an instant and desperate effort of every physical and moral nerve to throw off the weight; and hence the heaviest anguish often precedes a return tide of joy and courage.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVIII
15  Then, too, he was in a beautiful place, a consideration to which his sensitive race was never indifferent; and he did enjoy with a quiet joy the birds, the flowers, the fountains, the perfume, and light and beauty of the court, the silken hangings, and pictures, and lustres, and statuettes, and gilding, that made the parlors within a kind of Aladdin's palace to him.
Uncle Tom's Cabin By Harriet Beecher Stowe
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVI