LADY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - lady in Northanger Abbey
1  The silence of the lady proved it to be unanswerable.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
2  The season was full, the room crowded, and the two ladies squeezed in as well as they could.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
3  The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
4  But when a young lady is to be a heroine, the perverseness of forty surrounding families cannot prevent her.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
5  I bought one for her the other day, and it was pronounced to be a prodigious bargain by every lady who saw it.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
6  "Look at that young lady with the white beads round her head," whispered Catherine, detaching her friend from James.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
7  The mere habit of learning to love is the thing; and a teachableness of disposition in a young lady is a great blessing.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22
8  Every young lady may feel for my heroine in this critical moment, for every young lady has at some time or other known the same agitation.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
9  They danced again; and, when the assembly closed, parted, on the lady's side at least, with a strong inclination for continuing the acquaintance.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
10  In one respect she was admirably fitted to introduce a young lady into public, being as fond of going everywhere and seeing everything herself as any young lady could be.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
11  Cautions against the violence of such noblemen and baronets as delight in forcing young ladies away to some remote farm-house, must, at such a moment, relieve the fulness of her heart.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
12  But this was far from being the case, and though by unwearied diligence they gained even the top of the room, their situation was just the same; they saw nothing of the dancers but the high feathers of some of the ladies.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
13  From the latter circumstance it may be presumed that, whatever might be our heroine's opinion of him, his admiration of her was not of a very dangerous kind; not likely to produce animosities between the brothers, nor persecutions to the lady.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
14  She was separated from all her party, and away from all her acquaintance; one mortification succeeded another, and from the whole she deduced this useful lesson, that to go previously engaged to a ball does not necessarily increase either the dignity or enjoyment of a young lady.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
15  This compliment, delightful as it was, produced severe mortification to the lady; and in giving her denial, she expressed her sorrow on the occasion so very much as if she really felt it, that had Thorpe, who joined her just afterwards, been half a minute earlier, he might have thought her sufferings rather too acute.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
16  Mr. Tilney and his companion, who continued, though slowly, to approach, were immediately preceded by a lady, an acquaintance of Mrs. Thorpe; and this lady stopping to speak to her, they, as belonging to her, stopped likewise, and Catherine, catching Mr. Tilney's eye, instantly received from him the smiling tribute of recognition.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
17  For two days Mrs. Morland allowed it to pass even without a hint; but when a third night's rest had neither restored her cheerfulness, improved her in useful activity, nor given her a greater inclination for needlework, she could no longer refrain from the gentle reproof of, "My dear Catherine, I am afraid you are growing quite a fine lady."
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
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