LAW in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
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 Current Search - law in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
1  The law's delay, and the quietus which his pangs might take.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXI.
2  The law backs that old Judge Thatcher up and helps him to keep me out o my property.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI.
3  Yes, just as that man has got that son raised at last, and ready to go to work and begin to do suthin for him and give him a rest, the law up and goes for him.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI.
4  Next day he was drunk, and he went to Judge Thatcher's and bullyragged him, and tried to make him give up the money; but he couldn't, and then he swore he'd make the law force him.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER V.
5  Here's what the law does: The law takes a man worth six thousand dollars and up'ards, and jams him into an old trap of a cabin like this, and lets him go round in clothes that ain't fitten for a hog.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI.
6  But next minute I whirled in on a kind of an explanation how a valley was different from a common servant and had to go to church whether he wanted to or not, and set with the family, on account of its being the law.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVI.
7  The judge and the widow went to law to get the court to take me away from him and let one of them be my guardian; but it was a new judge that had just come, and he didn't know the old man; so he said courts mustn't interfere and separate families if they could help it; said he'd druther not take a child away from its father.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER V.