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Quotes from Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius by Niccolo Machiavelli
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 Current Search - law in Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius
1  The law itself embraced two principal provisions.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXXVII.
2  But in whatever way it happened, so it was, that this law was never spoken of in Rome without the whole city being convulsed.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXXVII.
3  Constant disturbances were occasioned in Rome by the tribune Terentillus, who, for reasons to be noticed in their place, sought to pass a certain law.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIII.
4  When the year for which the decemvirs were appointed at last came to an end, the two additional tables of the law were ready, but had not yet been published.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XL.
5  And when, in spite of this, the tribunes stubbornly persisted in their efforts to pass the law, declaring the act of Herdonius to be a device of the nobles and no real danger.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIII.
6  The first who attempted to pass a law to this effect was the tribune Terentillus, who proposed that a committee of five should be named to consider and regulate the power of the consuls.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXXIX.
7  I might also cite from our Florentine history the fall of Piero Soderini, which had no other cause than there not being in our republic any law under which powerful and ambitious citizens can be impeached.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VII.
8  There is nothing, therefore, which contributes so much to the stability and permanence of a State, as to take care that the fermentation of these disturbing humours be supplied by operation of law with a recognized outlet.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VII.
9  Hence the banishment and death of so many excellent men, and hence the law of ostracism, and all those other violent measures which from time to time during the history of that city were directed against her foremost citizens.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXVIII.
10  But the laws by which the people were controlled, as for instance the law relating to adultery, the sumptuary laws, the law as to canvassing at elections, and many others, were altered as the citizens grew more and more corrupted.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XVIII.
11  These two grounds of offence being given to a powerful class, to whom it appeared that by resisting the law they did a service to the State, the whole city, as I have said, was thrown into an uproar on the mere mention of its name.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXXVII.
12  A twofold blow was thus aimed at the nobles; since all who possessed more land than the law allowed, as most of the nobles did, fell to be deprived of it; while by dividing the lands of the enemy among the whole people, the road to wealth was closed.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXXVII.
13  The tribunes accordingly, fearing to lose their entire ascendency, consented to obey the consul, and to refrain for a year from moving in the matter of the Terentillian law; while the consuls, on their part, undertook that for a year the commons should not be called forth to war.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIII.
14  So that if the controversy over the Agrarian Laws took three hundred years to bring Rome to slavery, she would in all likelihood have been brought to slavery in a far shorter time, had not the commons, by means of this law, and by other demands, constantly restrained the ambition of the nobles.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXXVII.
15  Besides which, the people knew that laws had already been passed in their favour, as, for instance, the law allowing an appeal to the tribunes, and could therefore persuade themselves that the benefits granted them proceeded from the good-will entertained towards them by the senate, and were not due merely to the approach of an enemy.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXXII.
16  But Valerius being slain in the attack, Titus Quintius was at once appointed in his place, who, to leave the people no breathing time, nor suffer their thoughts to revert to the Terentillian law, ordered them to quit Rome and march against the Volscians; declaring them bound to follow him by virtue of the oath they had sworn not to desert the consul.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIII.
17  It is certain, however, that such States can never be reformed without great risk; for, as a rule, men will accept no new law altering the institutions of their State, unless the necessity for such a change be demonstrated; and since this necessity cannot arise without danger, the State may easily be overthrown before the new order of things is established.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II.
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