LEAVES in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
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 Current Search - leaves in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
1  I sat down there on a log, and looked out through the leaves.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII.
2  It was the leaves and rubbish on the raft and the smashed oar.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV.
3  We done it, and then peeped down the woods through the leaves.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII.
4  It warn't quite midnight yet, so we cleared out for the mill, leaving Jim at work.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVIII.
5  The other oar was smashed off, and the raft was littered up with leaves and branches and dirt.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV.
6  Every now and then I stopped a second amongst the thick leaves and listened, but my breath come so hard I couldn't hear nothing else.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII.
7  I got a good place amongst the leaves, and set there on a log, munching the bread and watching the ferry-boat, and very well satisfied.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII.
8  And when it was all done me and the hare-lip had supper in the kitchen off of the leavings, whilst the others was helping the niggers clean up the things.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVI.
9  There was freckled places on the ground where the light sifted down through the leaves, and the freckled places swapped about a little, showing there was a little breeze up there.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII.
10  The niggers was just getting through breakfast and starting for the fields; and Jim's nigger was piling up a tin pan with bread and meat and things; and whilst the others was leaving, the key come from the house.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIV.
11  Well, we swarmed along down the river road, just carrying on like wildcats; and to make it more scary the sky was darking up, and the lightning beginning to wink and flitter, and the wind to shiver amongst the leaves.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX.
12  My great-grandfather, eldest son of the Duke of Bridgewater, fled to this country about the end of the last century, to breathe the pure air of freedom; married here, and died, leaving a son, his own father dying about the same time.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIX.
13  My bed was a straw tick better than Jim's, which was a corn-shuck tick; there's always cobs around about in a shuck tick, and they poke into you and hurt; and when you roll over the dry shucks sound like you was rolling over in a pile of dead leaves; it makes such a rustling that you wake up.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XX.
14  But I soon give up that notion for two things: she'd be mad and disgusted at his rascality and ungratefulness for leaving her, and so she'd sell him straight down the river again; and if she didn't, everybody naturally despises an ungrateful nigger, and they'd make Jim feel it all the time, and so he'd feel ornery and disgraced.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI.
15  The stars were shining, and the leaves rustled in the woods ever so mournful; and I heard an owl, away off, who-whooing about somebody that was dead, and a whippowill and a dog crying about somebody that was going to die; and the wind was trying to whisper something to me, and I couldn't make out what it was, and so it made the cold shivers run over me.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.