MARRIAGE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - marriage in David Copperfield
1  I suppose we had some notion that this was to end in marriage.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33. BLISSFUL
2  Dora had often seen him since our marriage, and was quite fond of him.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50. Mr. PEGGOTTY'S DREAM COMES TRUE
3  She has gone to her brother's marriage, and will be away at least three weeks.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33. BLISSFUL
4  Such a marriage would irretrievably blight my son's career, and ruin his prospects.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32. THE BEGINNING OF A LONG JOURNEY
5  I am glad to think there were two such guileless hearts at Peggotty's marriage as little Em'ly's and mine.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. I BECOME NEGLECTED, AND AM PROVIDED FOR
6  As to marriage, and fortune, and all that, I believe I was almost as innocently undesigning then, as when I loved little Em'ly.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26. I FALL INTO CAPTIVITY
7  If I judged harshly of other people's mistakes in marriage, it may have been because I had bitter reason to judge harshly of my own.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 44. OUR HOUSEKEEPING
8  And it certainly might have been, as you say, a better and happier thing for my brother if he had never entered into such a marriage.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14. MY AUNT MAKES UP HER MIND ABOUT ME
9  It's very much to be wished that some mothers would leave their daughters alone after marriage, and not be so violently affectionate.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 45. MR. DICK FULFILS MY AUNT'S PREDICTIONS
10  The husband, whose name was Thomas Benjamin, had taken out his marriage licence as Thomas only; suppressing the Benjamin, in case he should not find himself as comfortable as he expected.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33. BLISSFUL
11  As to marriage licences, the competition rose to such a pitch, that a shy gentleman in want of one, had nothing to do but submit himself to the first inveigler, or be fought for, and become the prey of the strongest.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 39. WICKFIELD AND HEEP
12  Mr. Spenlow had stepped out, old Tiffey said, to get a gentleman sworn for a marriage licence; but as I knew he would be back directly, our place lying close to the Surrogate's, and to the Vicar-General's office too, I told Peggotty to wait.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33. BLISSFUL
13  Then Traddles and I played a game or two at cribbage; and Dora singing to the guitar the while, it seemed to me as if our courtship and marriage were a tender dream of mine, and the night when I first listened to her voice were not yet over.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 44. OUR HOUSEKEEPING
14  Still, as we drive along in an open carriage, this fairy marriage is real enough to fill me with a sort of wondering pity for the unfortunate people who have no part in it, but are sweeping out the shops, and going to their daily occupations.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43. ANOTHER RETROSPECT
15  Some attempts had been made, I noticed, to infuse new blood into this dwindling frame, by repairing the costly old wood-work here and there with common deal; but it was like the marriage of a reduced old noble to a plebeian pauper, and each party to the ill-assorted union shrunk away from the other.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50. Mr. PEGGOTTY'S DREAM COMES TRUE
16  On my return to Norwood, after the period of absence occasioned by my brother's marriage,' pursued Miss Murdstone in a disdainful voice, 'and on the return of Miss Spenlow from her visit to her friend Miss Mills, I imagined that the manner of Miss Spenlow gave me greater occasion for suspicion than before.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 38. A DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP
17  Of there being a breakfast, with abundance of things, pretty and substantial, to eat and drink, whereof I partake, as I should do in any other dream, without the least perception of their flavour; eating and drinking, as I may say, nothing but love and marriage, and no more believing in the viands than in anything else.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43. ANOTHER RETROSPECT
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