ME in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
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 Current Search - me in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
1  Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the widow to let me.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.
2  I was glad about that, because I wanted him and me to be together.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.
3  Miss Watson she kept pecking at me, and it got tiresome and lonesome.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.
4  Now she had got a start, and she went on and told me all about the good place.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.
5  She worked me middling hard for about an hour, and then the widow made her ease up.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.
6  She put me in them new clothes again, and I couldn't do nothing but sweat and sweat, and feel all cramped up.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.
7  Then I slipped down to the ground and crawled in among the trees, and, sure enough, there was Tom Sawyer waiting for me.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.
8  YOU don't know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.
9  Now the way that the book winds up is this: Tom and me found the money that the robbers hid in the cave, and it made us rich.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.
10  The widow she cried over me, and called me a poor lost lamb, and she called me a lot of other names, too, but she never meant no harm by it.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.
11  Her sister, Miss Watson, a tolerable slim old maid, with goggles on, had just come to live with her, and took a set at me now with a spelling-book.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.
12  But Tom Sawyer he hunted me up and said he was going to start a band of robbers, and I might join if I would go back to the widow and be respectable.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.
13  I didn't need anybody to tell me that that was an awful bad sign and would fetch me some bad luck, so I was scared and most shook the clothes off of me.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.
14  Here she was a-bothering about Moses, which was no kin to her, and no use to anybody, being gone, you see, yet finding a power of fault with me for doing a thing that had some good in it.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.
15  The Widow Douglas she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize me; but it was rough living in the house all the time, considering how dismal regular and decent the widow was in all her ways; and so when I couldn't stand it no longer I lit out.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.
16  After supper she got out her book and learned me about Moses and the Bulrushers, and I was in a sweat to find out all about him; but by and by she let it out that Moses had been dead a considerable long time; so then I didn't care no more about him, because I don't take no stock in dead people.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.
17  The stars were shining, and the leaves rustled in the woods ever so mournful; and I heard an owl, away off, who-whooing about somebody that was dead, and a whippowill and a dog crying about somebody that was going to die; and the wind was trying to whisper something to me, and I couldn't make out what it was, and so it made the cold shivers run over me.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.
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