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Quotes from Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius by Niccolo Machiavelli
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 Current Search - money in Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius
1  But lacking money, and fearing that on that account his soldiers might desert him, he was forced to hazard an engagement.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X.
2  These he obtains by means honourable in appearance, either by supplying them with money or protecting them against the powerful.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XLVI.
3  There are many circumstances, therefore, which may force a captain to give battle contrary to his intention, among which the want of money may sometimes be one.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X.
4  But this is no ground for pronouncing money to be the sinews of war, any more than those other things from the want of which men are reduced to the same necessity.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X.
5  It was for this reason that Quintus Curtius declared money to be the sinews of war, a maxim every day cited and acted upon by princes less wise than they should be.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X.
6  , in the recent war of Urbino; and yet, in every one of these instances, the victory remained with him who held the sinews of war to consist, not in money, but in good soldiers.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X.
7  And he who gave this State its constitution allowed its kings to do as they pleased as regards arms and money; but provided that as regards everything else they should not interfere save as the laws might direct.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XVI.
8  But he must be prudent enough not to deceive himself as to his strength, which he will always do, if he measure it by money, by advantage of position, or by the good-will of his subjects, while he is unprovided with an army of his own.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X.
9  Money, indeed, is most necessary in a secondary place; but this necessity good soldiers will always be able to supply, since it is as impossible that good soldiers should lack money, as that money by itself should secure good soldiers.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X.
10  In the latter case you must keep the enemy at a distance from your country, for as your strength lies not in men but in money, whenever the supply of money is cut off you are undone, and nothing so soon cuts off this supply as a war of invasion.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XII.
11  Without such an army no amount of money will meet your wants, the natural strength of your country will not protect you, and the fidelity and attachment of your subjects will not endure, since it is impossible that they should continue true to you when you cannot defend them.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X.
12  For we must assume that each pays his just share, since otherwise the impost would not yield the sum which, with reference to former imposts, it was estimated to yield; whereby the fraud would be detected, and thereupon some other method for raising money have to be resorted to.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER LV.
13  So that we cannot truly declare those tumults to have been disastrous, or that republic to have been disorderly, which during all that time, on account of her internal broils, banished no more than eight or ten of her citizens, put very few to death, and rarely inflicted money penalties.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV.
14  But whereas another republic would have punished these men with death, the Romans were content to inflict only a money fine: not because the offence did not in itself deserve severe handling, but because they were unwilling, for the reasons already given, to depart in this instance from their ancient practice.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXXI.
15  Lakes, and mountains, and the most inaccessible strongholds, where valiant defenders are wanting, become no better than the level plain; and money, so far from being a safeguard, is more likely to leave you a prey to your enemy; since nothing can be falser than the vulgar opinion which affirms it to be the sinews of war.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X.
16  Moreover, by attacking your enemy you deprive him of many opportunities for using his resources, since he can receive no aid from subjects who have been stripped of their possessions; and when an enemy is at his gates, a prince must be careful how he levies money and imposes taxes; so that, as Hannibal said, the springs which enable a country to support a war come to be dried up.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XII.
17  This opinion is put forward by Quintus Curtius, where, in speaking of the war between Antipater the Macedonian and the King of Sparta, he relates that the latter, from want of money, was constrained to give battle and was defeated; whereas, could he have put off fighting for a few days the news of Alexander's death would have reached Greece, and he might have had a victory without a battle.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X.
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