NEIGHBOUR in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
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 Current Search - neighbour in Ivanhoe
1  I am beset here with neighbours that match your infidels, Sir Knight, in Holy Land.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
2  Around the exterior wall was a deep moat, supplied with water from a neighbouring rivulet.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXI
3  The vanquished, of whom very few remained, scattered and escaped into the neighbouring wood.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
4  It was not altogether from a love to his neighbour, or to himself, or from a mixture of both.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
5  A deep fosse, or ditch, was drawn round the whole building, and filled with water from a neighbouring stream.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
6  He is a quick, apprehensive knave, who sees his neighbours blind side, and knows how to keep the lee-gage when his passions are blowing high.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XL
7  Escaping from thence, the stream murmured down the descent by a channel which its course had long worn, and so wandered through the little plain to lose itself in the neighbouring wood.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVI
8  His comrade had been a witness from a neighbouring battlement of the scene betwixt Rebecca and Bois-Guilbert, when she was upon the point of precipitating herself from the top of the tower.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
9  A barrow, in the vicinity of the castle, is pointed out as the tomb of the memorable Hengist; and various monuments, of great antiquity and curiosity, are shown in the neighbouring churchyard.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLI
10  But it does not please me, thou knave," said Cedric, "that I should be made to suppose otherwise for two hours, and sit here devising vengeance against my neighbours for wrongs they have not done me.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
11  But peasants from the neighbouring country were not refused admittance; for it was the pride of Beaumanoir to render the edifying spectacle of the justice which he administered as public as possible.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
12  At present, if we indeed journey to Ashby-de-la-Zouche, we do so with my noble neighbour and countryman Athelstane of Coningsburgh, and with such a train as would set outlaws and feudal enemies at defiance.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
13  At the bottom of the rock, and leaning, as it were, against it, was constructed a rude hut, built chiefly of the trunks of trees felled in the neighbouring forest, and secured against the weather by having its crevices stuffed with moss mingled with clay.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVI
14  Besides these bands, a less orderly and a worse armed force, consisting of the Saxon inhabitants of the neighbouring township, as well as many bondsmen and servants from Cedric's extensive estate, had already arrived, for the purpose of assisting in his rescue.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXV
15  Cedric the Saxon, overjoyed at the discomfiture of the Templar, and still more so at the miscarriage of his two malevolent neighbours, Front-de-Boeuf and Malvoisin, had, with his body half stretched over the balcony, accompanied the victor in each course, not with his eyes only, but with his whole heart and soul.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
16  The squires, who had found it a matter of danger and difficulty to attend their masters during the engagement, now thronged into the lists to pay their dutiful attendance to the wounded, who were removed with the utmost care and attention to the neighbouring pavilions, or to the quarters prepared for them in the adjoining village.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII